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Web Street Golf Daily Pulse
VOLUME 9, NUMBER 135                                                       
Friday, July 19 2019

ANY IDEA WHO SAID THIS? “You have an obligation as a professional athlete. If you play, you post your score. Am I happy about that? Is there some embarrassment to it? I don’t know. But I teed off in the Open and I shot 90 today. So put it on the board.”

BRAIN TEASER: Only three players under the age of 35 have won The Open Championship since 2007. Who are they?

BEAUTY IS IN THE EYE OF THE BEHOLDER! Golf fans worldwide and especially in the United States, are getting a taste of links golf with the playing of the Open Championship. It isn’t the prettiest to look at but it can pack a powerful punch. Links courses are built for the wind, which represents the defense of the course. However, wind rarely translates on television. Flagsticks will show direction but not necessarily its force. The wind can also easily influence putting; especially on the 3-5 footers players are called on to make.

When the wind shifts day-to-day or even hour-to-hour based on the tide table, any hole can become more or less difficult. Once again this doesn’t easily appear on television. Case in point, the role of the wind on a links course was perfectly summed up by Darren Clarke's clubbing on the par-three 3rd and 6th holes in the first round at Royal Portrush. According to his caddie, Clarke hit the ball exactly 186 yards each time. The first with a nine iron, the second with a four iron. Try and get your head around that, especially when you’re the one playing!

The PGA TOUR is a power game, mainly played through the air. Links golf is not. The ground often dictates the difference between a good or bad shot. Even the best of the best have to try and figure it out. “Just try and avoid bunkers, that's all. In links golf that's all I'm trying to do, I feel like that's the biggest penalty you can make out here or biggest mistake,” said Brooks Koepka. “If you can avoid those and put yourself on the right side of the hole, you're going to have a good chance to win the tournament.” He opened with a score of 3-under, 68.

“When you come to an Open Championship it's set up for anyone. Anyone can roll the ball on the ground. You don't have to hit the ball very far. You can actually hear it land and still roll it out there far enough. It opens up the field. The only difference is that when you come over here it's understanding how to play on the ground. It's a very different game. And chipping is different. The lies are tighter,” stated Tiger Woods, who had a tough first round. He was 7-over par.

Links golf might be an acquired taste for some and an immediate love affair for others. It doesn’t have the scenery of a parkland course, but it’s a challenge. For that watching take note of the beauty it provides. It is in the form of forcing playing to alter their strategy and perhaps get them out of their comfort zone. Driver won’t be the club of default off each tee and once someone is out of position, recovery can be rather painful!

NO PAIN, NO GAIN: Anyone else left wondering about the pre tournament preparations of Tiger Woods and Phil Mickelson? Woods had many buzzing when he took to social media for 1 am workouts. While Mickelson elected to go without food for six days. The early returns produced a score of +5 for Lefty and +7 for Woods. It doesn’t appear either strategy will inspire others to follow the former world #1’s

GIRL POWER: The R&A took some time out from the Open Championship to discuss business. “We have to keep growing The Open. This is our biggest event. And we need to keep growing it to keep it one of the greatest sporting events, with half an eye on how do we improve the difference in pay between The Open and the Women's British Open. We increased the Women's British Open prize money for this year by 40 percent, and to do that in line with our investments into the game,” said Martin Slumbers, Chief Executive of The R&A. “That's what's really important about The R&A. What we really care about is a great championship out here but we really care about the game. We want the game to be here 50 years from now. We want it to be thriving. We want more people to be playing it, more families to be playing it. And try to balance all that out. That's part of my job.”

The R&A announced Mastercard is a partner of the AIG Women’s British Open for the next three years, starting this year. “Mastercard has been a long-standing advocate of diversity and inclusion through partnerships in women’s sport. This brand partnership with the AIG Women’s British Open, not only gives us the chance to directly support female golf athletes; but it also offers new opportunities to engage women and girls who are new to the game, as well as providing priceless experience to existing players and fans from across the world,” said Ann Cairns, Executive Vice-Chairman of Mastercard.

WEB GEMS:

ROUGH DAY: Former Open champion David Duval made a 14 at one hole on his way to a score of 91 that also saw him make a triple-bogey and a quadruple-bogey during the first round at Royal Portrush. Included in the 14 was a 2-stroke penalty for playing the wrong ball and two other penalties for a lost ball. "Just done something I've never done as a professional. " said Duval, who noted he had shot 85 twice before. "It was a long day, a rough day.” READ MORE>>>

MESSY START: Rory McIlroy’s opening round was book-ended by disasters, a quadruple bogey at one end, a triple at the other. This wasn’t how it was meant to be, as the old course - on an historic day - spurned him without apology. And, having waited years in anticipation, time sucked the 30-year-old Northern Irishman into a great black hole within seconds which left him spinning out of control in compiling a 79 in his first round of the 148th British Open championship. READ MORE>>>

ANSWERS: “You have an obligation as a professional athlete. If you play, you post your score. Am I happy about that? Is there some embarrassment to it? I don’t know. But I teed off in the Open and I shot 90 today. So put it on the board.”--David Duval after the first round of the Open Championship.

Louis Oosthuizen (2010), Rory McIlroy (2014) and Jordan Spieth (2017) are the only players under the age of 35 to have won the Open Championship since 2007. Oosthuizen was 27, McIlroy 25 and Spieth was 23.

THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IS BELIEVED TO BE RELIABLE, BUT IT IS NOT GUARANTEED. THE OPINION EXPRESSED IS THAT OF TERRY MCANDREW AND SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED A SOLICITATION TO BUY OR SELL SECURITIES IN ANY OF THE COMPANIES DISCUSSED WITHIN THIS NEWSLETTER. CONTENTS OF THIS NEWSLETTER MAY NOT BE REPRINTED OR REBROADCAST WITHOUT THE EXPRESSED WRITTEN CONSENT OF TMAC GOLF

 

 

 

 

 

golfbiz

Web Street Golf Daily Pulse
VOLUME 9, NUMBER 134                                                       
Thursday, July 18 2019

ANY IDEA WHO SAID THIS? “When I don’t play well, I don’t feel good about myself. It hasn’t been a great place mentally, and I’m just trying to get out of it. It’s kind of a spiritual place, a spiritual tournament. If it was any other tournament, I’d take the week off. But I love being here; I love links golf. The fact that I’ve won this tournament relieves any pressure of trying to think about the results. Because I want to enjoy the experience.”

BRAIN TEASER: Americans have won each of the first three majors in 2019. When was the last time they won all four?

IRISH EYES ARE INDEED SMILING: Its safe to say the R&A will be hard pressed not to return the Open Championship back to Northern Ireland. An attendance record is expected for the 148th Open Championship staged outside St Andrews with 237,750 expected to attend. This year’s attendance surpasses the crowd of 235,000 who attended Royal Birkdale in 2017 and the 237,000 mark set at St Andrews in 2015 making it the second largest Championship ever. A record-breaking 61,000 fans have attended Practice Days surpassing the previous high of 52,000 set at Hoylake in 2006.

Martin Slumbers, Chief Executive at The R&A, said, “This is a huge week not just for The Open but for golf as well. We are making history with a record attendance for a Championship staged outside of St Andrews and the levels of excitement among fans this week have been phenomenal. I said last year that big time sport needs big time crowds and we certainly have that at Royal Portrush as we stage the biggest sporting event ever to be held in Northern Ireland. The eyes of the sporting world are firmly set on Royal Portrush.”

MORE IRONS IN THE FIRE: Mizuno has introduced the latest MP line of its player’s irons, MP-20. “Most modern muscle backs and limited ‘tour edition’ irons can be traced back to the great Mizuno blades. Though what makes a Mizuno iron truly exceptional is everything you can’t see,” said David Llewellyn, R&D Director, Mizuno Golf. “If you could peel back the chrome plating, you would find a sandwich of nickel and soft copper before the Grain Flow Forged HD chassis.  Under a microscope, you can see a perfect flow of grain within the steel from the hosel to toe, compacted tighter in the hitting area.  Designers can mimic our lines, but not what’s inside.”

Three irons – MP-20 (Muscle Back), MP-20 HMB (Hot Metal Blade) and MP-20 MMC (Multi Metal Construction) are being offered. The MP-20 is a grain flow forged HD from a single billet of 1025E Pure Select Mild Carbon Steel, then layered with soft Copper plating beneath a protective Nickel Chrome for feel and feedback. The MP-20 MMC is the second generation of Mizuno’s multi material concept delivers a thinner topline and refined scoring irons. Based on the chassis, set flow and proportions of the MP-20 muscle back it has a Titanium muscle plate and Tungsten sole weight. The MP-20 HMB is a full set of hybrid irons in a ‘tour ready’ profile. Inspired by the proliferation of long iron replacements on tour, the MP-20 HMB extends the concept right through to wedge!

THE X FACTOR: For most recreational golfers looking the part is just as important, if not more so, than actually playing it. In other words, fake it until you make it. If you’re looking for a new look PUMA Golf wants you to give it some consideration. It has introduced its new X Collection, a head-to-toe assortment of apparel; accessories and footwear that it believes demonstrate a new level of sophisticated styling. Consider it a chance to channel your inner Rickie Fowler!

Inspired in part by the celebration of Fowler’s 10-year partnership with PUMA, the X Collection celebrates his ability to bring the X-factor. “There are very few golfer and apparel company relationships that have yielded greater impact on the way golfers dress than that of PUMA and Rickie Fowler. From hi-tops and joggers to flat brim caps and untucked shirts, together Rickie and PUMA are setting trends and continuing to make an indelible mark on golf fashion,” said Grant Knudson, Head of Product Creation, PUMA Golf. “Rickie’s style has evolved over the years, starting various fashionable trends in on course wear by blending influences from streetwear and modern fashion. Today, his style reflects both a maturation in his game and personal confidence, and the X Collection was designed to reflect that transition in an elegant way.”

WEB GEMS:

DAY DREAMING? Royal Portrush Golf Club’s return to the British Open rota of courses after a gap of 68 years is an historic moment. But could an even potentially more seismic staging take place on the island of Ireland? As in somewhere like Portmarnock Golf Club? “I think this is the beginning of the Open taking its place as the Open and moving around the world,” asserted Pádraig Harrington, a two-time winner of the Claret Jug. “Where else would be the first place? Yes, Portmarnock would seem the logical first step, but in my lifetime it is possible to see it being played in the Netherlands or maybe Australia. These are all under the auspices of the R&A so it could move around the world.” READ MORE>>>

LONG SHOT? There’s something about playing golf on the island of Ireland that brings out the best in Jon Rahm. “It’s the closest I’ll ever feel to playing at home,” Rahm said, “without being at home.” READ MORE>>>

MOTHER NATURE! The final day of practice before the British Open Championship at Royal Portrush was hit by steady rain on Wednesday, and forecasts are for showers on the first two days of competition. READ MORE>>>

ANSWERS: “When I don’t play well, I don’t feel good about myself. It hasn’t been a great place mentally, and I’m just trying to get out of it. It’s kind of a spiritual place, a spiritual tournament. If it was any other tournament, I’d take the week off. But I love being here; I love links golf. The fact that I’ve won this tournament relieves any pressure of trying to think about the results. Because I want to enjoy the experience.”--Phil Mickelson.

Americans have won each of the first three majors in 2019 and have not won all four since 1982.

THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IS BELIEVED TO BE RELIABLE, BUT IT IS NOT GUARANTEED. THE OPINION EXPRESSED IS THAT OF TERRY MCANDREW AND SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED A SOLICITATION TO BUY OR SELL SECURITIES IN ANY OF THE COMPANIES DISCUSSED WITHIN THIS NEWSLETTER. CONTENTS OF THIS NEWSLETTER MAY NOT BE REPRINTED OR REBROADCAST WITHOUT THE EXPRESSED WRITTEN CONSENT OF TMAC GOLF

 

 

 

 

 

golfbiz

Web Street Golf Daily Pulse
VOLUME 9, NUMBER 133                                                       
Wednesday, July 17 2019

ANY IDEA WHO SAID THIS? “I want to play here as long as I possibly can. And you have to understand, if I play a lot, I won't be out here that long.”

BRAIN TEASER: Which one of these players in this group was the last to win the Open Championship: Todd Hamilton, Ben Curtis, David Duval, Justin Leonard, Louis Oosthuizen or Stewart Cink?

TIME TO UPGRADE? For some, wedges represent art. Others believe they all look the same. Over the years wedges haven’t changed all that much in appearance. Visual technology has been something retailers and manufacturers have enlisted in the sales process, especially with drivers. Harken back to the days when club heads were advancing to 450ccs and many considered that it in and of itself an immediate upgrade. Wedges never were able to participate in this phenomenon. Nevertheless, technological advances have been made and one company that has a rich history in the category has declared it has re-designed every component of the club.

PING said its engineers took a grip-to-grind approach in developing the new Glide 3.0 wedges. “In the Glide 3.0 series, we’re broadening the appeal of our wedges and providing more differentiation within our own line and the rest of the marketplace,” said John K. Solheim, PING President. “We approached the design with a goal of creating higher-spinning, great-looking wedges that also deliver more forgiveness with the improved feel from our other proven technologies. Every detail in the Glide 3.0 is designed to improve short-game performance, from the longer grip for choking down to the Hydropearl 2.0 chrome finish that helps the wedge glide through the grass.

“From a fitting standpoint, we engineered four distinctly different sole grinds, including an Eye2 sand-wedge-inspired option, to ensure that trained PING club fitters can properly match a Glide 3.0 to a golfer’s swing and playing conditions,” Solheim continued. “We’re excited about getting it into golfers’ hands. It had a win its first week on the PGA Tour when Nate Lashley used one in his amazing and inspiring victory at the Rocket Mortgage Classic.”

PING engineers leveraged the multi-material construction that combines a 431 stainless steel head with a larger and softer elastomer Custom Tuning Port (CTP) insert. Similar to the popular i210 irons, the additional volume of the CTP allows for a larger insert covering more of the back of the face, resulting in activation of the elastomer at impact to produce a soft yet solid feel, according to PING. The new, patented cavity design and larger CTP expand the perimeter weighting promises to increase the MOI and position the center of gravity higher to yield lower-launching, higher-spinning trajectories.

“The Glide 3.0 wedge is a great blend of a players-style design and game-improvement technology,” said Solheim. “At address, it provides the clean look of a tour-style wedge. We’ve added some offset based on tour player feedback to provide a more captured look. At the same time, we’ve increased the perimeter weighting and improved the feel with the softer insert material to ensure golfers have the forgiveness they need to play with confidence on approach shots. The combination of those attributes really sets the Glide 3.0 wedges apart and gives them a much broader appeal.”

The Glide 3.0 series offers four differentiated sole grinds and therefore an opportunity for golfers to be custom-fit and get more from their wedge game. “We see tremendous opportunity in wedge fitting in general,” said Solheim. “It starts by focusing our product designs on meeting the needs of golfers of all abilities and swings. With the new sole grinds and multiple loft options, a fitter can really dial in the wedges to help improve the player’s performance based on how they dynamically deliver the clubhead and the type of conditions they typically play in. During the process, they can also determine the best combination of wedges to provide proper distance gaps between each club.”

The Glide 3.0 wedge’s grip and shaft have been lightened by six and five grams, respectively, PING said, contributing to an overall weight reduction of 15 grams for the entire club. “The lighter overall weight allows the Glide 3.0 to better blend into a golfer’s full set and help them swing the club easier,” said Solheim. “We’ve also reduced the head weight by approximately four grams while maintaining our traditional wedge swing weights to ensure golfers still benefit from the clubhead feel they need to play with control and precision.”

The Glide 3.0 wedges ($160 per club w/steel shaft; $180 per club w/graphite shaft) are available at authorized PING golf shops around the world.

WEB GEMS:

FOR THE GOOD OF THE GAME? Justin Rose has broken ranks from golf’s leading players by criticizing the new schedule for 2019, which features four majors in as many months. “I think it’s pretty much driven by FedExCup, wanting to finish on a certain date, everything else having to fit in where it can,” Rose added. “For me major championships should be the things that are protected the most. That’s how all of our careers ultimately are going to be measured. Thirty, 40 years ago there wasn’t a FedExCup so if you’re trying to compare one career to another career, Jack [Nicklaus] versus Tiger [Woods], it’s the majors, they’re the benchmarks. For them to be tweaked so much I think is quite interesting at this point.” READ MORE>>>

READY TO RUMBLE? “[My game’s] not quite as sharp as I'd like to have it right now,” Woods said. “My touch around the greens is right where I need to have it. I still need to get the ball – the shape of the golf ball a little bit better than I am right now, especially with the weather coming in and the winds are going to be changing. I'm going to have to be able to cut the ball, draw the ball, hit at different heights and move it all around.” READ MORE>>>

ONE OF A KIND? Hardly a revelation for most in the field for The 148th Open, but Koepka has become somewhat of an outlier in recent months. “I just practice before the majors. Regular tournaments I don’t practice,” Koepka said. “If you’ve seen me on TV, that’s when I play golf.” READ MORE>>>

ANSWERS: I want to play here as long as I possibly can. And you have to understand, if I play a lot, I won't be out here that long.”--Tiger Woods.

The last player in this group to win the Open Championship was Louis Oosthuizen in 2010 at St. Andrews. Stewart Cink won in 2009 at Turnberry, Todd Hamilton (2004 at Troon), Ben Curtis (2003 at St. George’s), David Duval (2001 at Lytham and St. Annes), and Justin Leonard (1997 at Troon).

THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IS BELIEVED TO BE RELIABLE, BUT IT IS NOT GUARANTEED. THE OPINION EXPRESSED IS THAT OF TERRY MCANDREW AND SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED A SOLICITATION TO BUY OR SELL SECURITIES IN ANY OF THE COMPANIES DISCUSSED WITHIN THIS NEWSLETTER. CONTENTS OF THIS NEWSLETTER MAY NOT BE REPRINTED OR REBROADCAST WITHOUT THE EXPRESSED WRITTEN CONSENT OF TMAC GOLF

 

 

 

 

 

golfbiz

Web Street Golf Daily Pulse
VOLUME 9, NUMBER 132                                                       
Tuesday, July 16 2019

ANY IDEA WHO SAID THIS? “I do love the game of golf, I always have, and I try and represent it in a way unlike some and it's mostly by golf. I mean, I'm not going around curing cancer and doing a lot of things. But for me, playing in Japan and playing in Sweden and playing on the European Tour, going to Germany all those years to play, I really enjoyed that and I still enjoy playing. I just physically can't do the grind anymore, so I kind of get away from it.”

BRAIN TEASER: Everyone remembers a winner. But what else do you recall? Francesco Molinari won the 147th Open Championship by two shots. Four players tied for second. How many of them can you name?

IT’S GOING TO BE EPIC! Callaway has a few more tricks up its sleeve this year. The company has something retailers are going to love, but will consumers? It doesn’t have anything to do with performance but rather cost. Retailers will love the potential profit margins and consumers will have to decide whether to pony up.

The company is introducing a new line of ultra-premium, lightweight performance clubs. According to Callaway it developed a new lineup with a single caveat for its epicflashstardesign and engineering team: Come up with something that helps slower swing speed players reach their maximum distance potential. Callaway’s answer is the new Epic Flash Star driver, fairway and hybrids and Epic Forged Star irons. These clubs incorporate a variety of technologies like Flash Face, Jailbreak, and Face Cup.

Supplementing these technologies are a combination of premium, ultra-light shafts and grips that reduce the total weight compared to the average metalwood and iron. UST Mamiya’s ATTAS Speed graphite shafts, available exclusively in Japan until now along with Golf Pride’s thin and light JL00 (30g) and J200 (43g) grips provide weight savings.

The Epic Flash Star driver has Callaway’s Flash Face and Jailbreak technologies built into it with a UST Mamiya’s ATTAS Speed 30-gram graphite shaft teams and Golf Pride’s 30-gram JL00 grip. The company said the Epic Flash Star is 50 grams lighter than a standard Epic Flash driver – 266 grams vs. 316 grams. Callaway plans to release the Epic Flash Star driver for $699.99! The fairway woods have a 40-gram ATTAS Speed shaft and will be offered at $399.99 each. The Hybrids ($325 each) offer a choice of 40- or 50-gram ultralight ATTAS Speed graphite shafts and JL00 or J200 grip.

If you have any money left over after buying the driver, fairway woods and hybrids, then the irons will certainly put a dent in your wallet. The Epic Forged Star irons are forged with a 1025 carbon steel body, 360 Face Cup technology and a high-COR, according to the company. The irons are priced at $325 per club.

“Everything we know about helping golfers of all types generate more distance has gone into our new Epic Flash Star metalwoods and Epic Flash Star Forged irons,” said Dr. Alan Hocknell, head of R&D. “The combination of extremely light weight, fast face-speed and distanceenhancing CG locations should give any player immediate dividends in terms of added yardage. The saying ‘you get what you pay for’ applies to our new Epic Flash Star equipment. It costs more, but in return you get the absolute maximum in lightweight distance-enhancing design and technology.”
 
The Epic Star family debuts at retail starting on August 2nd.

THE KID IS ALL RIGHT! He’s yet to find the winner’s circle, but it would seem perhaps to be only a matter of time. Collin Morikawa only made three bogies over 72 holes at the John Deere and earned his 2019-2020 PGA Tour card on Sunday. He accomplished it in just his fifth start of the season. He finished T4 at the Deere after a T2 finish at the 3M Open.

WEB GEMS:

GO BIG OR GO HOME: Rory McIlroy has signaled an attacking policy for this week’s British Open, saying he hopes to use his driver liberally at Royal Portrush after having enjoyed considerable success with the strategy last year. READ MORE>>>

FORGOTTEN MAN? Even though he’s the defending champion and re-wrote the record books in last year’s Ryder Cup, you get the feeling that Francesco Molinari is flying under the radar a bit heading into this week’s 148th Open Championship. “Maybe part of it is my personality, not really caring too much about being in the spotlight,” he observed. “Part of it is being Italian. An American or British player is always going to naturally get more attention. I don’t mind that, it can only be good for myself as there is a little less pressure from the outside. I don’t mind it at all.” READ MORE>>>

LUCK OF THE IRISH? “If you try to overpower Royal Portrush at the Open you’ll be going home early.” READ MORE>>>

DRASTIC TIMES, DRASTIC MEASURES: “I haven't felt good about myself and the way I've been playing, and so I haven't done anything or wanted to be in public. I don't know if it's going to help me play better or not, but I'm willing to do whatever it takes to try to get my best back.” READ MORE>>>

ANSWERS: “I do love the game of golf, I always have, and I try and represent it in a way unlike some and it's mostly by golf. I mean, I'm not going around curing cancer and doing a lot of things. But for me, playing in Japan and playing in Sweden and playing on the European Tour, going to Germany all those years to play, I really enjoyed that and I still enjoy playing. I just physically can't do the grind anymore, so I kind of get away from it.”--Fred Couples.

Francesco Molinari won the 147th Open Championship by two shots over Justin Rose, Rory McIlroy, Kevin Kisner and Xander Schauffle.

THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IS BELIEVED TO BE RELIABLE, BUT IT IS NOT GUARANTEED. THE OPINION EXPRESSED IS THAT OF TERRY MCANDREW AND SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED A SOLICITATION TO BUY OR SELL SECURITIES IN ANY OF THE COMPANIES DISCUSSED WITHIN THIS NEWSLETTER. CONTENTS OF THIS NEWSLETTER MAY NOT BE REPRINTED OR REBROADCAST WITHOUT THE EXPRESSED WRITTEN CONSENT OF TMAC GOLF

 

 

 

 

 

golfbiz

Web Street Golf Daily Pulse
VOLUME 9, NUMBER 131                                                       
Monday, July 15 2019

ANY IDEA WHO SAID THIS? “If I didn't win another major for the rest of my career, nothing is going to change in my life. I'd be disappointed but again, it's not going to change things. I don't panic. It doesn't keep me up at night. I just need to give myself chances.”

BRAIN TEASER: Which major championship represents the highest and lowest winner earnings in U.S. dollars of the 2019 Grand Slam?

VERSATILITY: Another major championship and therefore another new product introduction from Titleist. Last month at the U.S. Open, the company had three new irons (T100, 620 MB and 620 CB) make their debut. This week at Royal Portrush, Titleist will debut the U-Series utility irons. There are two models – U•500 and U•510 –  to choose from. According to the company, the U•500 is the “player’s” utility iron. It is a low loft utility that delivers high launch with a soft landing, according to Titleist.

“U•500 is the incredibly versatile utility iron that tour players have been asking us for,” said Marni Ines, Director of Iron Development, Titleist Golf Club R&D. “It useriesshares a similar size and shape to our prior generation T-MB iron, but has been completely reimagined to give players specialized long iron performance. It’s faster, launches higher, lands softer, and feels better through impact. As you go up in the set and down in loft, everyone eventually can use help with launch. But from what we’re seeing on tour, it’s a club that can be hit almost as high as you want or as low as you want, and players are really gravitating toward that versatility.”

The U•510 provides hybrid-like performance in a forgiving, muscular iron shape. Titleist engineers were able to create a 16-degree 1-iron that is very playable from both the tee and turf in the 510, Titleist said. “U•510 is the launch king,” Ines said. “The larger shape and wide sole allowed us to place the tungsten weighting so that the CG is lower and further back than any iron we’ve developed – and what that translates into is a lot of launch angle. The ball just gets up and out and goes. It’s a very stable and forgiving golf club, but it’s got that extra forgiveness in terms of launch. During our consumer testing, golfers couldn’t believe the shots they were hitting with a 1-iron or 2-iron – they would just turn around and smile.”

“There are a lot of golfers out there who don’t want to play a hybrid, but are still searching for that kind of performance at the long end of their iron set,” said Josh Talge, Vice President, Titleist Golf Clubs. “They want to be able to launch it higher and farther, they want to be able to shape shots, they want to be able to land it close to the hole – they just want to do it with an iron in their hands. Everything that went into U•500 and U•510 was geared towards giving these golfers the performance, look and feel they’ve always hoped for in a long iron, and maybe didn’t think was possible.”

According to Titleist, the product is already the most played utility irons on the PGA Tour and in the bags of Adam Scott, Jordan Spieth and Jimmy Walker. “My 3-iron is hot and fast. It launches high, but I can still hit bullets with it. And when you set it down, it's a lot more forgiving than staring at my blade,” said Walker. “I mean the height advantage of this club, you just can’t compare. Golf clubs are geared for speed now, so when you know have the speed, you’re really looking for the control, you're looking for that balance – and that’s what this club gives you,” said Scott. The new U-Series is expected to be prominently on display this week at the Open Championship.

The Titleist U-Series U•500 and U510 utility irons will be available worldwide starting on August 30th, 2019, at Titleist authorized golf shops. The minimum advertised price is $250.

WEB GEMS:

THE TIGER SHOW: Only Tiger Woods knows what’s best for him. The question is whether that’s going to be good enough to win the British Open this week at Royal Portrush. It would be somewhere between Pollyanna and irresponsible not to question Woods’ preparation strategy for this British Open. READ MORE>>>

MORE THAN GOLF: It is the biggest sporting event ever hosted in Northern Ireland and the likes of Darren Clarke are determined that visitors leave with the correct impression of this welcoming community. This is their chance to sell themselves to the world, a chance they never thought would present itself as the bombs went off and the tensions smoldered seemingly interminably. Golf always felt like an escape. “Our schools were all segregated,’ Clarke recalled. “And the communities worked the same way. I never agreed with that. But it’s different if you play golf in Ireland. Because I travelled the country so much as a youngster, by the time I was 15 I had 20 times as many Catholic friends as I had Protestant friends. That was unheard of, but it was good for me. And it made me wonder why people just can’t get on with each other.” READ MORE>>>

HISTORY: The British Open returns to Royal Portrush for the first time since 1951, the only other time golf’s oldest championship has been held outside Scotland or England. Max Faulkner won his only major on a rainy final day in Northern Ireland. To mark the return, the AP is reprinting this story about the conclusion of the 80th British Open. It first appeared on July 6, 1951. READ MORE>>>

ANSWERS: “If I didn't win another major for the rest of my career, nothing is going to change in my life. I'd be disappointed but again, it's not going to change things. I don't panic. It doesn't keep me up at night. I just need to give myself chances.”--Rory McIlroy.

The 2019 winner earnings in US dollars of the four majors from highest to lowest are as follows: U.S. Open $2.25 million (thanks Fox Sports), Masters $2.07 million, PGA Championship $1.98 million and the Open Championship $1.935 million.

THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IS BELIEVED TO BE RELIABLE, BUT IT IS NOT GUARANTEED. THE OPINION EXPRESSED IS THAT OF TERRY MCANDREW AND SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED A SOLICITATION TO BUY OR SELL SECURITIES IN ANY OF THE COMPANIES DISCUSSED WITHIN THIS NEWSLETTER. CONTENTS OF THIS NEWSLETTER MAY NOT BE REPRINTED OR REBROADCAST WITHOUT THE EXPRESSED WRITTEN CONSENT OF TMAC GOLF

 

 

 

 

 
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