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Home Daily Golf Briefs Daily Pulse for November 27, 2017

 

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Web Street Golf Daily Pulse
VOLUME 7, NUMBER 230                                                       
Monday, November 27, 2017

ANY IDEA WHO SAID THIS? “Each year I lose 10 to 15 pounds throughout the year.  I’m trying to figure out a way to sustain weight and it’s not that a big of a deal, but if your body changes, the likelihood of your swing changing a bit goes up, versus if you can maintain the same body structure, so I’ve done some blood testing, I’ve done some body testing and build a nutrition plan to try and put on some weight, this off season, some good weight. I’ve done an average job of it, I’m trying.  It’s hard to eat as much as I need to eat, which I don’t get any remorse from people I talk to about it. I’m the opposite of what most people are trying to do, but it’s the same kind of situation where I’m trying to get that right. I’m not turning off burgers and beer, but I’m just trying to get enough of the right stuff.”

BRAIN TEASER: What was the last tournament Tiger Woods played in on the PGA TOUR?

THE NEEDS OF THE FEW OUTWEIGH THOSE OF THE MANY: Geoff Ogilvy is articulate, intelligent and not afraid to speak his mind. The latter, at least, makes the 2006 U.S. Open Champ stand out from his peers. The Aussie shared his thoughts on the infamous and never ending conversation, if can be called such, on the distance modern golf balls travel. Keep in mind his feelings are restricted to the professional game. No one yet seems to be concerned with the recreational level for some unknown reasons! To cut to the chase, Ogilvy is for rolling back the golf ball and two sets of rules for the pros and everyone else.

“If bifurcation is the way that we get to where we probably need to get, it’s the right thing to do,” he said prior to the start of the Australian Open in Sydney. “The major league baseball in America, they use wooden bats and every other level of baseball they use aluminum bats, and when the major league use aluminum bats, they don’t even have to touch it, it completely destroys their stadiums - it’s a comedy,” he explained. “That’s kind of what’s happened to us, at least the drivers of these big hitters, we’ve completely outgrown the stadium.

“What, do you rebuild every stadium in the world, and that’s expensive, or you just make the ball go shorter? It seems relatively simple from that perspective, but implementing that is obviously difficult. You’ve got to split up the rules between pros and amateurs and part of the appeal to professional golf is that we play the same game as everyone else. We’re all paid by manufacturers to tell everybody that the ball I use is better than everyone else’s ball and goes further and all that and that’s true. It’s a complicated thing, but it seems like if the USGA, Tiger, Jack’s been saying stuff for years, there’s more and more players and more and more guys on your side of the argument, more guys in the press are writing it, more people of influence

“It seems like it’s going to happen, and as I’ve said, just purely so we don’t have to change each stadium. For 100 years we were playing US Opens and Masters effectively on the same course. The golf had changed a little bit but maybe Jack hit it five per cent better than Bobby Jones or something, I don't know, but now it’s 50 per cent. It’s just complete nonsense. In my career it’s gone from 300 yards is a massive hit to 300 yards is a short hitter on Tour now, legitimately short. So, it’s changed, and it’s changed the way we play the great golf courses and that’s the crime, it isn’t really that the ball goes 400 (yards), that’s neither here nor there, it’s that the ball going 400 doesn’t make Augusta work properly, it just functions completely wrong. All the bunkers are wrong.

“There are guys currently now who are about to turn pro, who are turning pro, there’s this kid Cam Champ, who could drive it on the first hole at Augusta, fly it on the green without even thinking about it. It’s time for the time out at that point, and that’s kind of where it’s getting to,” he continued.

“As I said, implementation is going to be quite interesting, but it seems like the writing is on the wall and it’s going to happen at some point, don’t you think? For all intents and purposes, it’s an opportunity for the manufacturer to stand out again. All the balls are great now, they’re amazing, but all of a sudden, it’s kind of like square one in a way, it’s like guys, you can show us how good you are again, because in 10 years’ time they’ll get half the distance back, because they’ll work out how to do it.

“But that will be fun and that will be a new reason to buy the new Titleist because it goes better than the other one. Their version of this new ball is better than the other version of this ball, so there’s actually an opportunity there for everyone. I think it can work but as I said, the implementation is going to be interesting. We do actually need 8,500 (yard) golf courses if we don’t make the ball go shorter; that’s kind of what we do. You saw the US Open this year; it was a comedy how far they hit it. Koepka couldn’t hit more than a 7-iron on the longest course in history. That’s one solution, is to have 8,500-yard golf courses, but It seems like the other solution will be a little bit easier to get done. It’s one of the arguments you can make, I guess. It’s not the one I would make.”

There you have it. Change the ball to save the professional game by virtue of the venues they play. That’s what this really boils itself down to! Meanwhile, some would argue that like other sports, golf is a game of entertainment. People want to watch players do the impossible or at the very least things mortals aren’t capable of more days than not. MLB sells itself off the home run. Its what dominates the highlight reels. People want to see birdies and eagles. If it was bogies and pars, then they can do that themselves. Keep in mind; the definition of entertainment has changed today versus 20 and 50 years ago. Whether you agree or disagree, that’s now irrelevant.

The game is supported financially by people age 50 and over. While they can’t relate to hitting shots incredible distances, forcing them to watch the equivalent of traditional U.S. Open scores every week on TOUR isn’t going get the job done either.

WEB GEMS:

TOKYO BOUND? A repentant Jason Day insists he won't pass up the chance to represent Australia at the next Olympic Games. “I want to represent Australia, very much so. I represented Australia in the World Cup down in Melbourne [with Adam Scott in 2013] and I had a blast representing Australia. Japan is one of my favorite countries to ever visit and if I have a chance to get on the team I'm getting my plane ticket straight away.” READ MORE>>>

DAVIS’ DAY: Cameron Davis came from six shots behind going into the final round to win the Australian Open by one stroke on Sunday, shooting a 7-under 64 that included a birdie on the 18th and an eagle after holing a 100-meter approach shot. The 22-year-old Australian finished with an 11-under total of 273 at The Australian Golf Club, where gusty and unpredictable afternoon winds made scoring tough for all four rounds. Sweden’s Jonas Blixt, who missed a 12-foot birdie putt on the 18th that would have forced a playoff, shot 68 to finish tied for second with Matt Jones (68) while third-round leader Jason Day was fifth after a 73, three strokes behind. READ MORE>>>

AUSSIE, AUSSIE, AUSSIE: Australian Wade Ormsby won his maiden European Tour title with a two-under-par 68 in the final round of the Hong Kong Open on Sunday after Rafa Cabrera-Bello bogeyed the 18th to blow his chance of forcing a playoff. READ MORE>>>

FAXON TALKS TIGER: The gravity of the situation really hit me on Thanksgiving night – I was going to be playing a round with the President of the United States, the current World No. 1 and Tiger Woods.  It really made me kind of nervous and excited to play with that kind of spotlight. I’d played with Trump a few times previously, before he was in office. I hadn’t played with Tiger since 2005 and never played with Dustin, so there’s a lot of firsts going on. READ MORE>>>

ANSWERS: “Each year I lose 10 to 15 pounds throughout the year.  I’m trying to figure out a way to sustain weight and it’s not that a big of a deal, but if your body changes, the likelihood of your swing changing a bit goes up, versus if you can maintain the same body structure, so I’ve done some blood testing, I’ve done some body testing and build a nutrition plan to try and put on some weight, this off season, some good weight. I’ve done an average job of it, I’m trying.  It’s hard to eat as much as I need to eat, which I don’t get any remorse from people I talk to about it. I’m the opposite of what most people are trying to do, but it’s the same kind of situation where I’m trying to get that right. I’m not turning off burgers and beer, but I’m just trying to get enough of the right stuff.”--Jordan Spieth.

Tiger Woods was last seen on the PGA TOUR at the Farmers Insurance Open in January of 2017. He missed the cut with rounds of 76 and 72.

THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IS BELIEVED TO BE RELIABLE, BUT IT IS NOT GUARANTEED. THE OPINION EXPRESSED IS THAT OF TERRY MCANDREW AND SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED A SOLICITATION TO BUY OR SELL SECURITIES IN ANY OF THE COMPANIES DISCUSSED WITHIN THIS NEWSLETTER. CONTENTS OF THIS NEWSLETTER MAY NOT BE REPRINTED OR REBROADCAST WITHOUT THE EXPRESSED WRITTEN CONSENT OF TMAC GOLF