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Home Daily Golf Briefs Daily Pulse for January 11, 2018

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Web Street Golf Daily Pulse
VOLUME 8, NUMBER 7                                                           
Thursday, January 11, 2018

ANY IDEA WHO SAID THIS? “My goal is very similar to the last couple of years, which is to focus on the Major Championships and try and be in contention to win on the weekend in at least a couple of those. So this time of the season, these next four or five events that I play, I'm not really thinking about the Masters, but once we get into kind of March, that's where the real preparation starts. So there's goals within each kind of section of the season, and then this section is to try and win a tournament out of these next four or five events, and then as we go into the Masters, I kind of set a bar for the next -- March, April, May -- and then you get into each major season.”

BRAIN TEASER: Who currently leads the FedExCup standings?

GOING REGIONAL: Fifty-nine regional golf associations have entered into a new relationship with the United States Golf Association.  These Allied Golf Associations (AGAs), supported by the USGA’s five existing regional affairs offices, will administer the USGA Handicap and Course Rating Systems within defined geographic areas across the country. In addition, they will serve as the community’s primary resource for USGA services such as championship qualifiers, governance, golf facility support and programs that help grow and improve the long-term health of the game. Golfers can find an Allied Golf Association in their area by clicking here: http://www.usga.org/content/usga/home-page/about/allied-golf-associations.html

“Regional golf associations are a vital part of the golf community and the USGA,” said Mike Davis, USGA CEO. “As the game moves forward into the future, we feel this formalized new alliance of working together on grassroots programs will improve how we serve golfers and providing a healthy foundation from which the entire golf community can grow.”

Newly recognized AGAs were identified through a nearly year-long discovery process, according to the USGA, that encouraged collaboration among existing golf organizations within each state and region, sharing best practices and leveraging programs that have made a positive impact. The new relationship will enable AGAs to provide a variety of competitive playing opportunities that engage more golfers of all levels within their region. The AGAs will also serve as local experts for education on topics such as modernizing golf’s rules, the new World Handicap System and related governance functions.  

Each AGA will also have direct access to USGA research, funding for programs such as USGA P.J. Boatwright Internships, data and technology, additional expertise to better serve the health of golf facilities and support of national grow-the-game initiatives including PLAY9. 
One of the alliance’s most significant benefits will be the centralized computation of USGA Handicap Indexes in the United States to improve efficiency, consistency and governance oversight.

An AGA Council has also been formed to share information, help ongoing service delivery and provide continuous feedback directly to the USGA in an effort to better serve golfers and golf clubs. The 12-member council consists of AGA executive directors who will represent regions and markets throughout the United States.

The alliance marks the latest step by the USGA to more deeply engage the local and regional golf community. It complements the USGA’s existing presence in all five major golf regions in the United States – Northeast, Great Lakes, Southeast, Central and West – where dedicated Regional Affairs directors currently serve in residence.
In addition to its five Regional Affairs directors, the USGA also supports golf clubs and facilities through the USGA Green Section, providing agronomic expertise through 13 regional offices.

ANYTHING NEW? A New Year, therefore new hope? Not the case for some Canadian cities, which are facing similar challenges felt south of its border. Toronto owns seven golf courses, two of which it leases out to private operators and typically bring in $4.5 million to $5 million per year, which is not enough to recoup the costs of running them. Meanwhile the number of rounds played at municipal golf courses decreased by about 15 per cent between 2007 and 2016, from 187,000 to 157,965. The downward trend is expected to continue. READ MORE>>>

COMINGS AND GOINGS: PING has signed a deal with K.J. Choi, an eight-time TOUR winner, that will see him play a minimum of 13 PING clubs going forward, and sport the company's logo on the side of his hat and golf bag. The company has also re-signed three-time European Tour winner, Andy Sullivan. "PING have shown me such loyalty throughout my career, even back to my amateur days, so to be extending my association with them to wear the apparel feels like the perfect fit for me,” said Sullivan. "It's a family-owned company, so to be wearing the clothing as well as playing the clubs really makes me feel like a genuine part of that family.”

Callaway Golf reported it has re-signed several of its elite Tour staffers, including Henrik Stenson, Kevin Kisner, and Adam Hadwin. The Company also announced new signings to its Tour Staff, including PGA Tour veterans Robert Garrigus, Sam Saunders, Brice Garnett, Luke List, and LPGA player Georgia Hall.

WEB GEMS:

BACK IN THE BIGS: Jonathan Byrd resisted the urge to pout about his predicament. A five-time winner on the PGA Tour, he spent 14 years competing against the best on venerable courses while driving courtesy cars from nice hotels in big cities. And then he found himself on the Web.com Tour, the equivalent of golf’s minor leagues, with players he knew nothing about except for their raw talent and extreme power. They were the future. He was hanging onto the past. READ MORE>>>

IMAGE IS EVERYTHING? The slow pace of play isn't everyone's cup of tea - particularly when it comes to spectating. Despite the country boasting 2 million regular golfers, 70 percent of people in the UK who had watched the sport reported that it was "boring", including 52 percent who described it as "very boring." READ MORE>>>

ANSWERS: “My goal is very similar to the last couple of years, which is to focus on the Major Championships and try and be in contention to win on the weekend in at least a couple of those. So this time of the season, these next four or five events that I play, I'm not really thinking about the Masters, but once we get into kind of March, that's where the real preparation starts. So there's goals within each kind of section of the season, and then this section is to try and win a tournament out of these next four or five events, and then as we go into the Masters, I kind of set a bar for the next -- March, April, May -- and then you get into each major season.”--Jordan Spieth.

After a tie for fourth Sunday at the Sentry Tournament of Champions, Pat Perez moved atop the FedExCup standings, 43 points ahead of Sentry winner Dustin Johnson.

THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IS BELIEVED TO BE RELIABLE, BUT IT IS NOT GUARANTEED. THE OPINION EXPRESSED IS THAT OF TERRY MCANDREW AND SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED A SOLICITATION TO BUY OR SELL SECURITIES IN ANY OF THE COMPANIES DISCUSSED WITHIN THIS NEWSLETTER. CONTENTS OF THIS NEWSLETTER MAY NOT BE REPRINTED OR REBROADCAST WITHOUT THE EXPRESSED WRITTEN CONSENT OF TMAC GOLF