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Home Daily Golf Briefs Daily Pulse for February 7, 2018

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Web Street Golf Daily Pulse
VOLUME 8, NUMBER 26                                                         
Wednesday, February 7, 2018

ANY IDEA WHO SAID THIS? “Becoming No. 1 golfer in the world, it's a goal I've been working on for over 10 years and I'm only 23. So close to half of my life I've been working to get to that point. I think, not only for me, for every golfer, it's extremely important, but if you think about it, at the end of the day it's a reward for good play. If you keep playing good golf and you keep improving and your progression is the same, eventually you can get to No. 1. So I can't get too caught up on that because to get there I need to keep playing good tournaments. It's not just going to happen like that. So I try to keep my mindset on playing good golf week-in and week-out and hopefully keep playing good golf like I have been doing up until now.”

BRAIN TEASER: Which one of these players are not currently in the top 50 in the world rankings: Alex Noren, Paul Casey, Matthew Fitzpatrick, Patrick Cantlay or Keegan Bradley?

EQUIPMENT OR THE OPERATOR? In golf it’s the equivalent of the chicken or the egg: which comes first? Is it the player or the equipment? Gary Woodland won the Waste Management Phoenix Open last week and some would argue it was high time for him to visit the winner’s circle again. “Obviously it had been awhile, five years really since the last time I won,” Woodland acknowledged. “I had been in contention a lot in the last five years and had a lot of chances, just haven't put four rounds together. Coming off two solid weeks at Sony Open, finished 7th, finished 12th at Torrey Pines. But kind of same deal just didn't put four rounds together. Butch (Harman) called me before the first round on Thursday and said, let's forget about the results, let's forget about everything else, let's put four rounds together and see where that adds up at the end of the week. I think that put me at ease Saturday night. I think it put me at ease all day on Sunday. I wasn't trying to shoot a number, I wasn't trying to do anything, I was just trying to play my fourth good round of the week.”

However, an equipment change can also be linked to Woodland’s performance and results. “The ball striking's always been there, I think statistically I've been pretty good since I've been out here with iron play. I think the driver is coming in, I put a new driver in play two weeks ago, an M3, put a smaller head -- and I always played the 460, a big head out here -- I put a smaller head in. I don't know if that's mentally allows me to focus better but I've driven the golf ball as well as I have the last two weeks with the driver,” he said.

“But the short game is a huge deal for me because it allows me to play more aggressive and play more to my strengths. I don't have to play as conservative into the greens, I can play more aggressive, knowing I have a chance to get the ball up-and-down. When I get in trouble, I don't have to hit a hero shot, I know I can punch out and rely on my short game to save me. That was Pete's (Cowan) goal when I first started working with him was for my short game to allow me to win, I don't have to putt it great. I think that that's a huge deal for me to not have to put too much pressure on my putting, even though the putting is coming and I've improved this year, it's been, statistically, as good as it's ever been, I don't have to rely on that to win. I can rely on my ball striking and my short game to get me over that hump.”

For Woodland, though, smaller seems to be better when it comes to his driver. “I think that's the norm out here now, the bigger head. I don't know if TaylorMade has many guys playing the one I'm playing. The 460 head I played in Sony and I played great with it, I liked it, and then they just had the 440. I was like, let me try the smaller head. And I have a tendency to have a lot of mishits, hit a lot of balls on the toe, with the bigger head. For some reason, the last couple weeks, the smaller head, I don't know if I'm focusing more on trying to hit it center or what, but I've hit the ball out of the center of the face which has allowed me to drive the ball consistently more better.

“I played the 460 for so long, it's like looking at persimmon wood now. You look down and the thing looks very small. It definitely visually was an adjustment in San Diego, but once you hit it in the fairway it doesn't matter what it looks like.”

WEB GEMS:

SHARE THE WEALTH? Rory McIlroy’s hosting of the Dubai Duty Free Irish Open won’t be a one-man task any longer, with the PGA European Tour revealing that the tournament will have Pádraig Harrington, Darren Clarke and Graeme McDowell and past Ryder Cup captain Paul McGinley taking turns to play host in the future. READ MORE>>>

READING BETWEEN THE LINES: Former Ryder Cup captain Paul McGinley believes the next two tournaments will speak volumes about Rory McIlroy’s progress after the end of his break from the sport. "He is playing this week in Pebble Beach and next week in LA. The next two weeks more than anything else will tell us where he is at with his putting and where he is at mentally. The greens will not be perfect at Pebble Beach and neither in LA. I’m familiar with that coastline and the grass he faces. It’s bumpy, quick greens which is the two worst scenarios. It will really test him. We’ll have a view in the next weeks exactly where he is at and also comparing him to really strong fields, certainly in LA." READ MORE>>>

ANSWERS: “Becoming No. 1 golfer in the world, it's a goal I've been working on for over 10 years and I'm only 23. So close to half of my life I've been working to get to that point. I think, not only for me, for every golfer, it's extremely important, but if you think about it, at the end of the day it's a reward for good play. If you keep playing good golf and you keep improving and your progression is the same, eventually you can get to No. 1. So I can't get too caught up on that because to get there I need to keep playing good tournaments. It's not just going to happen like that. So I try to keep my mindset on playing good golf week-in and week-out and hopefully keep playing good golf like I have been doing up until now.”--Jon Rahm

Keegan Bradley is currently outside the top 50. He is ranked 64th. Alex Noren is 16th, Paul Casey is 17th, Matthew Fitzpatrick is 30th and Patrick Cantlay is 38th.

THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IS BELIEVED TO BE RELIABLE, BUT IT IS NOT GUARANTEED. THE OPINION EXPRESSED IS THAT OF TERRY MCANDREW AND SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED A SOLICITATION TO BUY OR SELL SECURITIES IN ANY OF THE COMPANIES DISCUSSED WITHIN THIS NEWSLETTER. CONTENTS OF THIS NEWSLETTER MAY NOT BE REPRINTED OR REBROADCAST WITHOUT THE EXPRESSED WRITTEN CONSENT OF TMAC GOLF