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Home Daily Golf Briefs Daily Pulse for April 5, 2018

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VOLUME 8, NUMBER 67                                                         
Thursday, April 5, 2018

ANY IDEA WHO SAID THIS? “Nobody respects and appreciates what he's done for the game more because nobody's benefited from what he's done for the game of golf more than I have. I've always had that appreciation and respect for him. To see him back out playing is incredible. We all feel that. I texted him a while ago when he was playing at Valspar that it felt like it was a different time continuum because I found myself pulling so hard for him. It was unusual. And I find that I want him to play well, and I'm excited to see him play so well. And he is playing well.”

BRAIN TEASER: The name Amen Corner refers to hole Nos. 11, 12 and 13. Who is credited with coming up with its name?

THE OLD BALL GAME: Fred Ridley, former president of the USGA and current chairman of Augusta National is the latest to be questioned on the distance golf balls are traveling. He was diplomatic, as expected, yet one can’t help scratching their head wondering how long this straddling of the fence can continue.

“I'm very familiar with the public statements that have been made recently. You know, our focus initially is on our golf course. We are intent on making sure that we maintain the design philosophy that Mr. Jones and Alister MacKenzie devised. And with the shot values that they thought were important, we have done what we felt was appropriate through the years to maintain that philosophy and that design, those design parameters. There's a great quote from Bobby Jones dealing specifically with the 13th hole, which has been lengthened over time, and he said that the decision to go for the green in two should be a momentous one. And I would have to say that our observations of these great players hitting middle and even short irons into that hole is not a momentous decision.

“And so we think there is an issue, not only there, but in the game generally, that needs to be addressed. The ultimate decision is going to be, I'm confident, a collective one. It's going to be one where all of the stakeholders sit down and come to some agreement. From our perspective, we will always do what's necessary to maintain the integrity of our golf course. But as I said in my comments, I don't think that's the only approach to this. So my hope is that every organization, every stakeholder involved will look at this issue from a holistic basis and not only what might be in the best interests of their own organization.

“We fully appreciate and want-- do not want any action to be taken that's going to make golf harder. We have an obligation to grow the game, and so we're sensitive to that. So these issues don't always coincide. And like any difficult question, it requires compromise and debate. So as long as we're all talking to one another and looking out for what's in the best interest of the game, I'm confident that there's going to be a solution that's going to work for everyone.

So a couple of take aways from Ridley’s words. The first is momentous when it comes to the 13th hole. It would seem Ridley and company don’t believe a mid to short iron into the green represents a momentous decision, regardless of the actual outcome. Second is holistic. It would seem the open dialogue/debate will be enacted for the infamous good of the game, whilst not making it any harder than it already is. Not sure that is possible. For example, a momentous decision going for the green in two at 13 must imply a longer shot/club, which in turn enhances the difficulty. You can’t have one without the other, in other words!

The harsh reality is that the professional game is at a much different level than the recreational one. If the stakeholders were to discuss this, wouldn’t it involve someone/thing representing the needs of the paying public? It is what is it.

LADIES ARE WELCOME: Making his first State of the Masters address, Augusta chairman Fred Ridley said the club, that had barred women from membership until six years ago, would welcome the world’s top female amateurs to compete. The Augusta National Women’s Amateur Championship will take place the week before next year’s U.S. Masters. READ MORE>>>

TIME IS MONEY: Women love purses and shoes. Some men have a thing for watches. Perhaps that helps to explain Tommy Fleetwood as the latest addition to OMEGA's already impressive roster of golfing ambassadors.

"At OMEGA, we love golf and it's a great thrill to have a passionate player like Tommy join our team of ambassadors. We're proud to play a part in his very promising career," stated CEO and President of OMEGA, Mr. Raynald Aeschlimann.

"Omega is very special to me,” responded Fleetwood, “I’m not only proud to be an ambassador for one of the world's most prestigious brands, I’m also very honored to be joining two elite players I’m lucky enough to call friends. I’m really looking forward to all of us working together".

Tommy Fleetwood joins Rory McIlroy, Sergio Garcia and Michelle Wie as part of  OMEGA's roster of ambassadors.  

WEB GEMS:

JUSTIN THOMAS’ FIRST MASTERS: My parents took me to Augusta for the first time in 2003, when I was 11 years old. We made the eight-and-a-half hour drive down from Kentucky, and I could barely contain my excitement the whole way. I know a golf tournament isn’t the kind of thing most 11-year-olds would geek out about, but in my family, it was pretty much all golf, all the time. My grandfather is a golf pro, and my dad it the PGA Tour pro at our local golf course back in Louisville. I’ve been playing since I was four, and even four isn’t that early for a kid to start. How old was Tiger? Two, maybe? Heck, I probably lost a couple of key years there.

I don’t even think you need to be a fan of golf to understand the meaning of the Masters. But for me, as a young fan, driving our car through the gates at Augusta National was like driving through the gates of heaven. When we got out of the car, we raced to the 2nd hole, picked a spot right behind the green and set up our chairs where we could see all the action. Then my dad and I walked around a little bit to kind of soaked it all in before the first players teed off. READ MORE>>>

ANOTHER FIRST: Casey will never forget sitting in his front room in Weybridge, Surrey, as a 10-year-old watching the continuation of the European takeover of Georgia. It was at that moment when the ambition first crystallized, when the Masters dream took hold. “It is my first memory not just of watching golf on the TV, but of watching any sport on the TV, indeed of watching anything on the TV,” Casey said. “I can still see it now, Sandy hitting it into the bunker on the 18th and then hitting that seven-iron and it rolling down the slope before he holed the putt and did that jig.” READ MORE>>>

THEY NEVER GET OLD: Tommy Fleetwood had an unexpected source to thank for avoiding the 'curse' of the par-three contest after Tom Watson became the oldest winner of the traditional Masters warm-up. Playing alongside Watson and Gary Player, the 78-year-old Jack Nicklaus finished just a shot further back and amazingly saw his grandson and caddie Gary (known as GT) make a hole-in-one on the ninth. READ MORE>>>

ANSWERS: “Nobody respects and appreciates what he's done for the game more because nobody's benefited from what he's done for the game of golf more than I have. I've always had that appreciation and respect for him. To see him back out playing is incredible. We all feel that. I texted him a while ago when he was playing at Valspar that it felt like it was a different time continuum because I found myself pulling so hard for him. It was unusual. And I find that I want him to play well, and I'm excited to see him play so well. And he is playing well.”--Phil Mickelson on Tiger Woods.

The name Amen Corner refers to hole Nos. 11, 12 and 13. It was first coined in a 1958 Sports Illustrated article by Herbert Warren Wind, who wrote that it was composed of the second half of No. 11, No 12 and the first half of No 13.

THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IS BELIEVED TO BE RELIABLE, BUT IT IS NOT GUARANTEED. THE OPINION EXPRESSED IS THAT OF TERRY MCANDREW AND SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED A SOLICITATION TO BUY OR SELL SECURITIES IN ANY OF THE COMPANIES DISCUSSED WITHIN THIS NEWSLETTER. CONTENTS OF THIS NEWSLETTER MAY NOT BE REPRINTED OR REBROADCAST WITHOUT THE EXPRESSED WRITTEN CONSENT OF TMAC GOLF