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Home Daily Golf Briefs Daily Pulse for April 9, 2018

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VOLUME 8, NUMBER 69                                                         
Monday, April 9, 2018

ANY IDEA WHO SAID THIS? “I've been waiting for this chance, to be honest. I always have said that, you know, 2011 was a huge turning point in my career. It was the day that I realized I wasn't ready to win major championships, and I needed to reflect on that and realize what I needed to do differently. But now I am ready. I learned a lot from it. I'm happy to be in the final group.”

BRAIN TEASER: How many PGA TOUR career wins does Patrick Reed have before his win on Sunday at Augusta?

HOME WORK ASSIGNMENT, PART TWO: For those of you that accepted the challenge of doing some homework over the weekend, thank you. Imagine the surprise when the 36-hole cut line for the 2018 Masters wasn’t that much different than in 2017 or 2016. Yes, you could argue history repeated itself.

So for the wall of worry that the game is easier since players have less club in their hands for their second shots is questionable. The focus is always on the winning score and there are several factors that influence the outcome. Mother Nature is certainly one of them. In 2015, Jordan Spieth’s wining score was 18 under, 270. In 2016, Danny Willett won shooting 5-under, 283. Last year, Sergio Garcia was victorious at 9-under, 279.  Patrick Reed finished the job with posting a score of 15-under par to win the 2018 Masters.

Cut Line:
2018 -- 52 professionals and one amateur at 5-over 149 from a field of 81 professionals and six amateurs.
2017 -- 51 professionals and two amateurs at 6-over 150 from a field of 88 professionals and five amateurs.
2016 -- 55 professionals and two amateurs at 6-over 150 from a field of 83 professionals and six amateurs.
2015 -- 55 professionals at 2-over 146 from a field of 90 professionals and seven amateurs made the 36-hole cut.
2014 -- 50 professionals and one amateur at 4-over 148 from a field of 91 professionals and six amateurs made the 36-hole cut.
2013 -- 60 professionals and one amateur at 4-over 148 from a field of 87 professionals and six amateurs.

BY THE BOOK: Carl Jackson is widely considered a priceless alternative. Known as the greens whisperer of Augusta National, Jackson worked 54 Masters, including 39 as the bag man for the two-time champion Ben Crenshaw. When Greller was about to caddie in his first Masters, in 2014, he sought out Jackson to try to absorb some of his knowledge about Augusta’s bedeviling breaks and slopes. Every tournament week since, Greller has checked in several times with Jackson, who first caddied at the Masters as a 14-year-old in 1961. The two do not go over notes because Jackson stores all his knowledge on the pages of his mind. Greller said the best advice he had received from Jackson had nothing to with a fall line or a pin placement. It was simply: “There will be multiple times you’ll be confused. Then you trust your instincts.” To remind himself, Greller writes a note on some pages amid all the technical jargon: “TRUST YOUR INSTINCTS.” READ MORE>>>

WEB GEMS:

FATHER TIME STILL UNDEFEATED: “That was it for me; I’m done,” O’Meara said. “I love this championship. It’s just a tough golf course when you’re 61. This is my last Masters, and I’m OK with that,” he said, adding, “I’ll be able to enjoy the Tournament a little bit more now going down the road.” READ MORE>>>

REED TRIUMPHS: Patrick Reed became famous playing for his country. He won for himself on Sunday at the Masters. Rory McIlroy came after him early. Jordan Spieth briefly tied him for the lead. Rickie Fowler birdied the last hole to leave him no room for error. Reed never flinched through it all on a raucous afternoon at Augusta National, calmly rolling in a 3-foot par putt for a 1-under 71 and a one-shot victory. Captain America is now the Masters champion. READ MORE>>>

ANSWERS: “I've been waiting for this chance, to be honest. I always have said that, you know, 2011 was a huge turning point in my career. It was the day that I realized I wasn't ready to win major championships, and I needed to reflect on that and realize what I needed to do differently. But now I am ready. I learned a lot from it. I'm happy to be in the final group.”--Rory McIlroy.

Patrick Reed had won 5 times on the PGA TOUR before his win at the Masters.

THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IS BELIEVED TO BE RELIABLE, BUT IT IS NOT GUARANTEED. THE OPINION EXPRESSED IS THAT OF TERRY MCANDREW AND SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED A SOLICITATION TO BUY OR SELL SECURITIES IN ANY OF THE COMPANIES DISCUSSED WITHIN THIS NEWSLETTER. CONTENTS OF THIS NEWSLETTER MAY NOT BE REPRINTED OR REBROADCAST WITHOUT THE EXPRESSED WRITTEN CONSENT OF TMAC GOLF