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Home Daily Golf Briefs Daily Pulse for April 11, 2018

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Web Street Golf Daily Pulse
VOLUME 8, NUMBER 71                                                         
Wednesday, April 11, 2018

ANY IDEA WHO SAID THIS? “Honestly I don't really care what people say on Twitter or what they say if they are cheering for me or not cheering for me. I'm out here to do my job, and that's to play golf. I feel like if I'm doing it the right way, then that's all that really matters.”

BRAIN TEASER: This is the 50th RBC Heritage. Can you name the player that won the inaugural event?

BALL GOES TOO DAMN FAR! You have to wonder whether officials of the USGA and R&A will watch the RBC Heritage with greater interest due to the fact last season, Harbour Town GL had the shortest Driving Distance (All Drives) on a single course of all PGA TOUR events. The field average was 273.4 yards from the tee. Just over one out of every 10 (10.84%) drives went over 300 yards off the tee, marking the third lowest percentage of drives over 300 yards of any course in the 2016-17 PGA TOUR season!

Ryan Palmer led the field in Driving Distance (All drives), averaging 284.6 yards off the tee en route to a T11 finish at the 2017 RBC Heritage. Ryan Palmer and Bud Cauley led the field with 15 total drives over 300 yards, last year, at Harbour Town GL.

Meanwhile, the greens at Harbour Town GL have ranked inside the top 10 toughest greens to hit on TOUR in five of the last six seasons. Last season, players hit the green in regulation on 61.46% (4,547 of 7,398) of the holes played at Harbour Town. In 2013, players only hit 57.15% of the greens in regulation, ranking as the toughest greens to hit on TOUR for that season.

TIMES ARE CHANGING: Golf has become a 21st century marketing game. It’s especially true in the equipment sector. The TOUR has decided to get with the time and is updating it message. For the first time in more than 20 years, the PGA TOUR is launching a new advertising campaign. Titled “Live Under Par,” the campaign plays on golf’s unique scoring language to portray the pursuit of excellence by TOUR players as well as the PGA TOUR’s ingrained mission of giving back.

The campaign aims to reach beyond the core golf fan and attract new and diverse fan segments to the sport. “The ‘Live Under Par’ campaign goes beyond capturing the incredible ability of PGA TOUR players to score below par each week by showcasing and celebrating that same attitude of excellence that exists between players, players with fans, and players interacting with communities and charities,” said Joe Arcuri, Chief Marketing Officer of the PGA TOUR.  “The new campaign captures not just a way to play, but a way to be.”

“Live Under Par” becomes the TOUR’s first new theme and tagline since “These Guys Are Good,” the longest-running advertising campaign among major sports, debuted in 1997. “We consider this campaign more of an evolution, growing from how our players’ competitive excellence was presented so effectively through ‘These Guys Are Good’ to doing that and so much more,” Arcuri said. “We are pulling the camera lens out, so to speak, to highlight the fun and excitement on TOUR and highlight the special interaction we see every week between our players and fans. We believe this, in turn, will help spur broader interest among a more diverse group of fans.’”

A WORK IN PROGRESS: PGA TOUR Champions announced a change to the season-ending Charles Schwab Cup Playoffs, effective beginning in 2018. The Charles Schwab Cup Championship, which previously featured a points reset at the season’s last event, will now feature double points awarded to the 36-player field, as approved by the Tour’s Policy Board. READ MORE>>>

WEB GEMS:

HEAD GAMES: McIlroy has Masters mental block “with a capital B” says psychologist. READ MORE>>>

SOONER OR LATER? Rory McIlroy’s fourth bid for the career Grand Slam was his best chance. He played in the final group with Patrick Reed and pulled to within one shot early until his putter failed him. He tied for fifth, and would seem to have time on his side. From purely a historical perspective, it might not get any easier the longer he goes. While five players have completed the career Grand Slam, only three of them knew what they were winning. The modern version of the Grand Slam didn’t really start until Arnold Palmer raised the notion of winning all four professional majors in 1960. No one asked Gene Sarazen about the career Grand Slam when he won the Masters in 1935. Augusta National didn’t even award a green jacket until 1952. Ben Hogan won the fourth leg at Carnoustie in 1953. READ MORE>>>

ANSWERS: “Honestly I don't really care what people say on Twitter or what they say if they are cheering for me or not cheering for me. I'm out here to do my job, and that's to play golf. I feel like if I'm doing it the right way, then that's all that really matters.”--Masters Champ, Patrick Reed.

Arnold Palmer was the inaugural winner of the RBC Heritage

THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IS BELIEVED TO BE RELIABLE, BUT IT IS NOT GUARANTEED. THE OPINION EXPRESSED IS THAT OF TERRY MCANDREW AND SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED A SOLICITATION TO BUY OR SELL SECURITIES IN ANY OF THE COMPANIES DISCUSSED WITHIN THIS NEWSLETTER. CONTENTS OF THIS NEWSLETTER MAY NOT BE REPRINTED OR REBROADCAST WITHOUT THE EXPRESSED WRITTEN CONSENT OF TMAC GOLF