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Home Daily Golf Briefs Daily Pulse for May 17, 2018

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Web Street Golf Daily Pulse
VOLUME 8, NUMBER 97                                                         
Thursday, May 17, 2018

ANY IDEA WHO SAID THIS? “He's the best scorer out here. He seems to be the guy when you play with him that you just add up a couple less shots than it looked like he had. Tiger used to do the same. Still does the same, really. I don't know that is. I mean it's hard to put your finger on it. You can't go through the stats and find that. It's the intangibles. He makes the important putt to keep the momentum going at the time and you can't statistically measure that. That's just one of those things that you notice it when it happens but you can't really measure it. He does that stuff really well. I think he has a really good sense for what score he needs to shoot for the week. On the outside he sometimes is chattering to himself pretty hard, his patience level is pretty high and he can turn it around pretty quick like Tiger used to.”

BRAIN TEASER: Which player has the most career cuts made on the PGA TOUR?

REMEMBER THE PAST: To some extent, golfers are also somewhat historians. It helps to explain the affection shown towards such places as St. Andrews, Pinehurst or Pebble Beach. The USGA has launched the U.S. Open History Experience, a timeline that brings 117 years of U.S. Open Championships to life on usopen.com. It allows fans to engage digitally with the championships of the past, while celebrating the U.S. Open’s champions, signature moments and yes, iconic venues. The experience features a user-driven journey through time by immersing fans in videos, photos, articles, championship scoring and player statistics.

“Whether it is Ben Hogan’s 1-iron at Merion in 1950 or Tiger Woods’ putt at Torrey Pines in 2008, the U.S. Open has supplied many of golf’s signature moments,” said Navin Singh, USGA head of Global Content and Media Distribution. “We are excited to launch this immersive history experience in a year when we return to one of our founding clubs, Shinnecock Hills – the only club that has hosted this championship in three different centuries. Fans will have a place to not only relive the four previous championships at Shinnecock but immerse themselves in all 117 years of golf’s ultimate test.”

Users can relive significant moments in the game but also perhaps hold personal and sentimental meaning. From Jack Nicklaus’ 1-iron on the 17th hole at Pebble Beach in 1972 to Payne Stewart’s putt to seal victory at Pinehurst in 1999 to Corey Pavin’s 4-wood approach on the final hole that clinched his win in 1995 at Shinnecock, the U.S. Open History Experience offers the opportunity to reflect on the past. Celebrating the U.S. Open’s return to Shinnecock Hills, the USGA produced new content for the experience, including reflections by the three living champions from Shinnecock Hills: Raymond Floyd (1986), Pavin and Retief Goosen (2004).

With archival video content dating to Ted Ray’s victory in 1920, fans can explore and navigate in a variety of ways to access highlights from U.S. Open history, featuring champions, venues and signature moments from the championship.

Golf enthusiasts will also be able to view full-field hole-by-hole scoring data from more than 60 U.S. Opens, going all the way back to the 1897 championship. Hole-by-hole scores are available for all 117 U.S. Open champions. Optimized across all devices, the timeline will also feature detailed player statistics, including driving distance, putting and greens in regulation, from select U.S. Opens as far back as 1940. The mobile responsive timeline also integrates multiple social sharing functions that allow fans to post directly to Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

HAIL TO THE CHEIF: Donald Trump’s becoming president didn’t really do much to spur revenue at his golf courses, financial disclosures released Wednesday show. READ MORE>>>

WEB GEMS:

SOMETHING DIFFERENT: “The most common question is, ’What’s it like?’” Spieth said. “Pretty vague question but, you know, I say it’s very different. These are my words: It’s really fun as a member, as a change-of-pace kind of golf club.” Spieth (No. 3) and ninth-ranked Hideki Matsuyama, making his Nelson debut Thursday, are the only players from the world top 10 in the field. Sergio Garcia, the Nelson winner two years ago and 2017 Masters champ, is next at 14th. “Look, most people just don’t like different, do they?” asked Adam Scott, the 2008 Nelson champ playing the event for the first time in six years. “This is just different than what we normally roll out and play.” READ MORE>>>

ANOTHER START: Five-times champion Tiger Woods has committed to playing in the Memorial Tournament in Dublin, Ohio, for what is likely to be his final tune-up ahead of next month’s U.S. Open. “I have been so impressed with Tiger during his comeback, and as I said after last weekend, I think he is on the verge of winning for the first time in several years,” Memorial tournament founder and host Jack Nicklaus said in a statement. READ MORE>>>

ANSWERS: “He's the best scorer out here. He seems to be the guy when you play with him that you just add up a couple less shots than it looked like he had. Tiger used to do the same. Still does the same, really. I don't know that is. I mean it's hard to put your finger on it. You can't go through the stats and find that. It's the intangibles. He makes the important putt to keep the momentum going at the time and you can't statistically measure that. That's just one of those things that you notice it when it happens but you can't really measure it. He does that stuff really well. I think he has a really good sense for what score he needs to shoot for the week. On the outside he sometimes is chattering to himself pretty hard, his patience level is pretty high and he can turn it around pretty quick like Tiger used to.”--Geoff Ogilvy on Jordan Spieth.

Jay Haas made 592 cuts in 798 events played during his time on the PGA TOUR. He has $14,440,317 career earnings from the PGA TOUR along with 9 wins. Second on the list is Tom Kite (586 cuts made in 710 events) followed by Raymond Floyd (582 cuts made in 726 events played. Kite won 19 times and made $11,041,021 in career earnings on the PGA TOUR, while Floyd won 22 times and earned $5,323,075. Gene Littler (564 out of a possible 645) and Doug Ford (553 out of a possible 737) round out the top five.

THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IS BELIEVED TO BE RELIABLE, BUT IT IS NOT GUARANTEED. THE OPINION EXPRESSED IS THAT OF TERRY MCANDREW AND SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED A SOLICITATION TO BUY OR SELL SECURITIES IN ANY OF THE COMPANIES DISCUSSED WITHIN THIS NEWSLETTER. CONTENTS OF THIS NEWSLETTER MAY NOT BE REPRINTED OR REBROADCAST WITHOUT THE EXPRESSED WRITTEN CONSENT OF TMAC GOLF