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Home Daily Golf Briefs Daily Pulse for May 21, 2018

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Web Street Golf Daily Pulse
VOLUME 8, NUMBER 99                                                         
Monday, May 21, 2018

ANY IDEA WHO SAID THIS? “I personally think golf is a lot more difficult today if you want to try and play for a living. There is so much information you’re giving something up to someone else. We have had video technology since the 70s and everyone can now video their swing and we’re 40 years into it at least (with video technology) and still no two swings look a like. But the information you can get off Trackman for optimization, those are things that make golf hard on TOUR. If you’re a kid exposed to all the information versus someone that doesn’t have any of it you’re behind the eight ball. Its more of a bomber’s paradise today but there is no formula to it because its different everyday. The hall of fame is full of different swings, grips and positions at the top.”

BRAIN TEASER: This player saw his streak of consecutive cuts made end at 30 over the weekend. Who is he?

IT ALWAYS COMES BACK TO MONEY: The second United States Open, in 1896, was played at the Shinnecock Hills Golf Club, a course situated on a strip of Long Island once owned by the Shinnecock Indians and built by a Shinnecock work crew. But, with the U.S. Open headed back to Shinnecock Hills next month, the relationship between the tribe and the U.S.G.A. may be fraying. READ MORE>>>

SEE YOU IN COURT: ECCO Sko A/S (“ECCO” or “Plaintiff”) filed a patent infringement complaint alleging that Skechers USA, Inc. (“Skechers”) is infringing four of their golf shoe patents. The cleat structure and arrangement of cleats on the soles appears to be at the center of the dispute. READ MORE>>>

LONG IS RARELY WRONG: All of the forces that conspired to spark an ongoing surge in distance—club and ball technology and physical fitness among them—have made elite distance a significantly bigger advantage than it used to be. The longest hitters land their tee shots close enough to the green to use wedges on their approach shots. Those high-lofted clubs can cut through the rough with such ease that it largely nullifies the penalty. Rory McIlroy, a prototypical bomb-and-gouge player, said he would gladly give up 20 to 25 yards off the tee if it would mean hitting the fairway an extra 15% of the time. “One hundred percent, I would do that,” he said. “But we grow up around this game not knowing how to hit an easy driver. You stand up with a driver and you hit it as hard as you can and you hope it’s going to go in the fairway.” READ MORE>>>

WEB GEMS:

SECOND GUESSING? “Would it have been better if I’d never won the Masters?” It’s the shocking question Danny Willett’s had to ask as he sunk to world No 434. READ MORE>>>

THE TIGER EFFECT: “The biggest thing I remember from it was how poorly he played in those first two days and yet he still finished 12th in the tournament,” he added. “That’s when you learn that, ‘my God, hitting it has got nothing to do with how you actually perform and score.’ Because literally he hit it sideways for two days and still got himself in contention.” READ MORE>>>

ANSWERS: “I personally think golf is a lot more difficult today if you want to try and play for a living. There is so much information you’re giving something up to someone else. We have had video technology since the 70s and everyone can now video their swing and we’re 40 years into it at least (with video technology) and still no two swings look a like. But the information you can get off Trackman for optimization, those are things that make golf hard on TOUR. If you’re a kid exposed to all the information versus someone that doesn’t have any of it you’re behind the eight ball. Its more of a bomber’s paradise today but there is no formula to it because its different everyday. The hall of fame is full of different swings, grips and positions at the top.”--Paul Azinger

Matt Kuchar, a top-10 machine, had the longest streak of consecutive cuts made at 30 ended at the AT&T Byron Nelson at Trinity Forest Club in Dallas. He hadn't missed a weekend since last year's Houston Open, which comes the week before the Masters.

THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IS BELIEVED TO BE RELIABLE, BUT IT IS NOT GUARANTEED. THE OPINION EXPRESSED IS THAT OF TERRY MCANDREW AND SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED A SOLICITATION TO BUY OR SELL SECURITIES IN ANY OF THE COMPANIES DISCUSSED WITHIN THIS NEWSLETTER. CONTENTS OF THIS NEWSLETTER MAY NOT BE REPRINTED OR REBROADCAST WITHOUT THE EXPRESSED WRITTEN CONSENT OF TMAC GOLF