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Home Daily Golf Briefs Daily Pulse for June 12, 2018

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Web Street Golf Daily Pulse
VOLUME 8, NUMBER 114                                                       
Tuesday, June 12, 2018

ANY IDEA WHO SAID THIS? “Don’t make it ridiculous like last time. I finished in the 30s or something but was well up in the putting stats [seventh] because I like fast greens. But they were ridiculous by the Sunday. They lost control by their decision not to water overnight and instead to double-cut the greens. The seventh hole gained all the attention that day, with players four-putting and five-putting and watching tiddlers roll past and straight off the green. But, to be honest, it was daft all week. I think I hit it once in the four days with a hard, slicing seven-iron that managed to cling on to the left side. I hope they have learned their lessons.”

BRAIN TEASER:  What year did Mike Davis become the CEO of the USGA?

WILL HISTORY REPEAT ITSELF? Since 1991, only five champions have finished better than 15th in trying to defend their U.S. Open crowns. Tiger Woods tied for sixth in 2009 after capturing his third national title at Torrey Pines the previous year. Woods also tied for 12th in 2001 after winning his first U.S. Open at Pebble Beach. Retief Goosen tied for 11th in 2005 following his second U.S. Open championship victory, at Shinnecock Hills. Graeme McDowell tied for 14th the year after winning the 2010 U.S. Open at Pebble Beach. Justin Rose tied for 12th in 2014 following his victory at Merion Golf Club in 2013. Meanwhile, eight champions have missed the cut the following year, during this period, including Dustin Johnson in 2017.

WHAT THE WINNER RECEIVES: Among the benefits enjoyed by the U.S. Open winner are an exemption for the next 10 years, an invitation to the next five Masters Tournaments, the next five Open Championships, the next five PGA Championships and the next five Players Championships. He will also pick up an exempt status on the PGA Tour for five years. And $2.16 million!      

WINNER’S CLUBS: Dustin Johnson picked up his second victory of the season by winning the 2018 St. Jude Classic. It is his 18th PGA TOUR victory in his 232nd career start and he is the sixth multiple winner in the 2017-18 PGA TOUR Season (Justin Thomas, Patton Kizzire, Jason Day, Justin Rose, Bubba Watson). His 19-under winning total scorched his 2012 mark by 10 shots (-9)! In 10 stroke-play events this season, Johnson’s lowest finish came at THE PLAYERS Championship (T17). The victory also moves him back to the #1 player in the world. “Winning this week I think is a bigger confidence booster than being No. 1 in the world,” he said afterwards. Here is what Dustin Johnson used to win the 2018 ST. Jude Classic.

Driver: M4 Driver | 10.5*
Fairway Woods: M4 Fairway | 3HL 16.5*
Irons: TaylorMade P730 DJ Proto Irons | 3-PW 
Wedges: TaylorMade Milled Grind Raw Wedges | 52* & 60* + 64*
Putter: Spider Tour Black Putter
Ball: TP5x

Daniel Berger’s– Numbers for the week:
Eagles: 2
Birdies: 21
Pars: 44
Bogeys: 4
Double Bogeys: 1
Cumulative Score: 261

Daniel Berger / 2017 FedEx St. Jude Classic:
Driver: Callaway GBB Epic (10.5*)
Fairway Woods: Callaway GBB Epic (15*)
Irons: Callaway Apex CF 16 (3 and 4 iron), Callaway Apex Pro 2016 (5-iron), Callaway MB1 (6-PW)
Wedges: Callaway Mack Daddy Forged (50*, 56*, 58*)
Putter: Odyssey 2-Ball Prototype
Ball: Callaway Chrome Soft

Daniel Berger’s– Numbers for the week:
Eagles: 0
Birdies: 19
Pars: 44
Bogeys: 9
Double Bogeys: 0
Cumulative Score: 270

Daniel Berger / 2016 FEDEX ST. Jude Classic.
Driver: TaylorMade M2 (10.5 degrees) with a Fujikura Pro Series 53 shaft
Fairway Metal: TaylorMade M2, (17 degrees)
Irons: TaylorMade RocketBladez Tour (3) and TaylorMade Tour Preferred MC 11 (4-PW) with Project X 6.5 shafts
Wedges: TaylorMade Tour Preferred EF (50, 60 degrees) and Tour Preferred ATV (56 degrees) with True Temper Dynamic Gold S400 shafts
Putter: TaylorMade Ghost Corza
Golf Ball: Titleist Pro V1x
Shoes: FJ DryJoys Tour golf shoes

Daniel Berger’s– Numbers for the week:
Eagles: 0
Birdies: 20
Pars: 46
Bogeys: 5
Double Bogeys: 1
Cumulative Score: 267

WEB GEMS:

IS PERCEPTION, REALITY? His irons are sublime, his driver for the most part long and straight. If we’ve learned anything from his latest comeback, Tiger Woods can still putt a bit, too. A decade ago that would have made him the overwhelming pick to win the U.S. Open. Heck, a decade ago he won the U.S. Open basically on one leg for what, incredibly enough, was his last major championship win. But as Woods docks his yacht near Shinnecock Hills this week he’s still a golfing enigma of sorts. His scores are decent, if not spectacular, but he’s yet to win and has only been in serious contention once in nine tournaments this year. Is the real Tiger finally back? READ MORE>>>

LAST CHANCE OR HAS THIS SHIP ALREADY SAILED? Phil Mickelson is running out of time. Mickelson doesn’t need to be reminded that this is his 27th appearance in the U.S. Open, more than any of the 156 players at Shinnecock Hills. He wouldn’t want to be reminded that 65 players — including the last four major champions — were not even born when Mickelson was low amateur in his first U.S. Open in 1990 at Medinah. “I just can’t believe that time has flown by so fast,” he said Monday. The desire hasn’t changed, only the emphasis. READ MORE>>>

DRAMA, DRAMA, DRAMA: Lee Westwood and Luke Donald have weighed into a debate over gamesmanship just days before the US Open, after one player admitted to breaking the laws of golf while playing on the PGA Tour. Jimmy Walker, the 2016 US PGA champion, took aim at Westwood, saying on Twitter that he found it hard to believe that the Englishman did not help out other golfers by leaving his ball when it is on the green close to the pin, rather than picking it up and marking the spot where it stopped, so his opponent can use it as a backstop if they are attempting a tricky shot. READ MORE>>>

ANSWERS:  “Don’t make it ridiculous like last time. I finished in the 30s or something but was well up in the putting stats [seventh] because I like fast greens. But they were ridiculous by the Sunday. They lost control by their decision not to water overnight and instead to double-cut the greens. The seventh hole gained all the attention that day, with players four-putting and five-putting and watching tiddlers roll past and straight off the green. But, to be honest, it was daft all week. I think I hit it once in the four days with a hard, slicing seven-iron that managed to cling on to the left side. I hope they have learned their lessons.”--Lee Westwood on the USGA and Shinnecock Hills.

Mike Davis began his tenure as the United States Golf Association’s executive director on March 2, 2011, and assumed the title of Chief Executive Officer in 2016.

THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IS BELIEVED TO BE RELIABLE, BUT IT IS NOT GUARANTEED. THE OPINION EXPRESSED IS THAT OF TERRY MCANDREW AND SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED A SOLICITATION TO BUY OR SELL SECURITIES IN ANY OF THE COMPANIES DISCUSSED WITHIN THIS NEWSLETTER. CONTENTS OF THIS NEWSLETTER MAY NOT BE REPRINTED OR REBROADCAST WITHOUT THE EXPRESSED WRITTEN CONSENT OF TMAC GOLF