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Home Daily Golf Briefs Daily Pulse for June 14, 2018

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VOLUME 8, NUMBER 116                                                       
Thursday, June 14, 2018

ANY IDEA WHO SAID THIS? “There's usually something guys complain about. This week, there's none of that. You can kind of write people off straight away if they're complaining. When it comes to the U.S. Open, it tests every part of your game and the mental side as well. So whatever you get, you get. You just got to suck it up and keep going. I like the stressful part of trying to win a tournament, and I like the stressful part of trying to win a Major. I'm not a mud runner, but like to a certain degree, I enjoy tough conditions because I feel like I thrive better than, per se, an easier course where everyone can come in and play.”

BRAIN TEASER: What was the winning score at the 2017 U.S. Open by Brooks Koepka?

CLARITY? Davis stressed tour data is not the sole source of the distance discussion going forward. “There is good data [already available] on what Bubba Watson and Dustin Johnson do,” he said. “That’s not the data we need. We need data on what is happening with the 34,000 golf courses around the world. What’s going on with the recreational game and how it’s being played, the time and the cost.” READ MORE>>>

TIMING IS EVERYTHING: Titleist has decided to use the US Open as the first event to begin seeding a new driver. Historically, the company has used the Quicken Loans National in Washington, D.C to start its tour validation process. And former world #1 Justin Thomas is preparing to put it into play immediately.

“I first tested it at The PLAYERS. We were able to do some testing off-site and hit some balls with it. I like the feel of it,” he said in advance of play at Shinnecock. “Kind of tweaked it a little bit to get a little bit different feel off the club to kind of get it exactly where I wanted. Has a little bit more spin, which is good for me.

“I don't exactly hit the ball with the driver the same way that I used to. It's not quite as much up on it, a little bit more shallow, just from an accuracy standpoint. But it gives me that little bit of the ball staying in the air, and I'm able to control it a little bit more, at least that's what I've noticed in the last couple weeks,” he continued. “It's a little bit faster, which is always good. It was definitely an easy adjustment, and hopefully it will pay off well this week.”

OLD SCHOOL: The last time the US Open was contested at Shinnecock in 2004, analytics hadn’t been discovered in golf. So how did some players approach golf’s ultimate test? Phil Mickelson shared some of his notes from the last time the USGA went to Shinnecock when he finished second.

“The notes that I had in 2004 are all accurate. In fact, they were 100 percent the same from 2004 as they are today. But the notes that I took weren't precise, like this putt breaks X amount. The notes were that you must stay here for this pin, you must go here for this pin, the odds of getting up and down from this spot are 50 percent, 10 percent. So it just guided me on where I need to be for different pin placements and how I want to attack the hole, and that stayed the same from 2004.”

WEB GEMS:

A NEW TIGER EFFECT: Rory McIlroy says the current generation have been inspired not only by growing up watching Woods at his peak, but also getting to know him as a person. READ MORE>>>

PLAY IT STRAIGHT? The U.S. Open wants to be the ultimate test in golf, and sometimes that leads to a series of trick questions. One of them was 14 years ago at Shinnecock Hills. A year after Jim Furyk tied the U.S. Open scoring record at Olympia Fields, the weekend of the 2004 U.S. Open was so bone dry and lightning fast that only three players broke par on the weekend, none on Sunday. Fans having to move to the side because of a golf ball rolling toward them is not unusual, except when the player hit the shot with his putter from the green. Tee shots that landed on the seventh green rolled off the putting surface and into a bunker. One year after Rory McIlroy broke the U.S. Open scoring at Congressional, no one broke par at Olympic Club in 2012 when Webb Simpson won. Moments like this lead to criticism that the USGA overreacts. Justin Rose sees it another way. READ MORE>>>

ANSWERS: “There's usually something guys complain about. This week, there's none of that. You can kind of write people off straight away if they're complaining. When it comes to the U.S. Open, it tests every part of your game and the mental side as well. So whatever you get, you get. You just got to suck it up and keep going. I like the stressful part of trying to win a tournament, and I like the stressful part of trying to win a Major. I'm not a mud runner, but like to a certain degree, I enjoy tough conditions because I feel like I thrive better than, per se, an easier course where everyone can come in and play.”--Jason Day.

Brooks Koepka shot scores of 67-70-68-67—272 (-16) at the longest U.S. Open (7,741 yards/par-72) to win by 4 shots over Hideki Matsuyama and Brian Harman.

THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IS BELIEVED TO BE RELIABLE, BUT IT IS NOT GUARANTEED. THE OPINION EXPRESSED IS THAT OF TERRY MCANDREW AND SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED A SOLICITATION TO BUY OR SELL SECURITIES IN ANY OF THE COMPANIES DISCUSSED WITHIN THIS NEWSLETTER. CONTENTS OF THIS NEWSLETTER MAY NOT BE REPRINTED OR REBROADCAST WITHOUT THE EXPRESSED WRITTEN CONSENT OF TMAC GOLF