Subscribe
Font Size
Join our Mailing List
DailyPulse
Home Daily Golf Briefs Daily Pulse for June 20, 2018

golfbiz

Web Street Golf Daily Pulse
VOLUME 8, NUMBER 120                                                       
Wednesday, June 20, 2018

ANY IDEA WHO SAID THIS? “When you have a championship that comes down to either luck or a fortuitous bounce or sheer luck, that's not right and we are there already. It's unfortunate that our nation's tournament is already shot at a venue that they lost 14 years ago.”

BRAIN TEASER: Who did Jordan Spieth defeat in a playoff to win the 2017 Travelers Championship?

BOTTOMS UP: On New Year’s Eve in 1895, the steam produced by the Village Power House enabled The Holly Inn to welcome the first guests to Pinehurst with the very latest in luxury amenities - heat and electricity.

For decades, the steam plant powered the homes, hotels and cottages of Pinehurst until it was shuttered in the 1990s, falling into disrepair and, at one time, slated for demolition. Now, after a full renovation by Pinehurst Resort, the steam plant will re-emerge as the Pinehurst Brewing Company, which is planned to open this fall.

Much of the original steam plant building remains, but instead of turbines and generators, it will feature a 10-barrel microbrewery. An observation platform overlooking the brewhouse will be a focal point of the taproom, and the dining room will be complemented by a bar, a beer garden and an all-seasons patio.

The Pinehurst Brewing Company will operate in the historic building that still reflects its first use. Parts of the brewhouse’s walls remain blackened from the decades it housed massive steam boilers. The unique exterior brick corbeling – rarely seen in architecture today - is preserved, and the vintage arches and windows have been restored. Brick walls that have been standing for over 120 years give way to high ceilings, and the plant’s smokestack will be rebuilt using its original base, returning a lost but defining feature of the Village’s early landscape.

Portions of the plant have been renovated to include a smokehouse for the restaurant and a greenhouse for herbs, which could be used for both the restaurant and for brewing ingredients. A trellis designed to replicate the train track that brought coal into the plant covers seating outside. The trellis is supported by the same pylons that held the track in the early 1900s.

“For almost a century, the steam plant provided power to the Village. We hope this next incarnation of the building as the Pinehurst Brewing Company provides a surge of energy for the entire community,” says Pinehurst President Tom Pashley.

Beer will be brewed by Eric Mitchell, the former head brewer of Heist Brewery in Charlotte. Considered one of the most highly regarded young brewers in the country, while at Heist Mitchell won recognition from the World Beer Cup and others. His IPA, Citraquench’l, consistently ranks among the Top 10 IPAs in the United States, and in February last year, fans braved the winter cold and camped out in line to be among the first to buy a new release of Mitchell’s bourbon barrel-aged stout, Cataclysm.

The brewery is among the most significant of recent additions to the Resort, which includes its new short course, The Cradle, and a redesign of Pinehurst No. 4 by noted golf architect Gil Hanse.

WEB GEMS:

R.I.P.: Peter Thomson lived over 50 years of his life with the addendum ‘‘five-times British Open champion’’. His life was much more, but it was his signature. Thomson dominated the tournament that is the unofficial world championship of the game between 1952 and 1965 on the seaside links of Scotland and England. In that period, he won the title five times (1954-5-6-8-65), and was second three times. From 1954 to 1956 he won three times in a row, a feat managed by only a handful of players. It makes him arguably Australia’s greatest golfer. Some say Greg Norman holds this mantle. Asked about this once, Thomson said that neither he nor Norman owned the sobriquet; that it belonged to Karrie Webb, winner of seven major titles on the women’s tour. This was typical of Thomson, who had the self-belief common to all great sports people, but who also knew his limitations. His confidence was not overt, and he carried a dignity all of his own. READ MORE>>>

ENOUGH ALREADY! Note to the USGA: It’s time to stop trying to micro-manage the U.S. Open. Certainly not Shinnecock Hills. I’m talking about the art and science of setting up the golf course. All week we heard and saw evidence that the USGA field staff and the crew under Superintendent Jonathan Jennings had matters in hand in terms of the layout. As it turns out, the golf course held up well in terms of turf quality and consistency. The greens kept their cover, and for surfaces that were 60-70 percent Poa annua rolled well, even if there was the occasional, unavoidable bumpiness. Even when things got dicey Saturday afternoon, the putting surfaces held up well in terms of roll. The problem, once again, was not with the agronomy but with the setup of some of the hole locations. READ MORE>>>

ANSWERS: “When you have a championship that comes down to either luck or a fortuitous bounce or sheer luck, that's not right and we are there already. It's unfortunate that our nation's tournament is already shot at a venue that they lost 14 years ago.”--Two time major champion, Zach Johnson.

Jordan Spieth won the 2017 Travelers Championship in a playoff over Daniel Berger. He won with a birdie on the first hole of sudden death.

THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IS BELIEVED TO BE RELIABLE, BUT IT IS NOT GUARANTEED. THE OPINION EXPRESSED IS THAT OF TERRY MCANDREW AND SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED A SOLICITATION TO BUY OR SELL SECURITIES IN ANY OF THE COMPANIES DISCUSSED WITHIN THIS NEWSLETTER. CONTENTS OF THIS NEWSLETTER MAY NOT BE REPRINTED OR REBROADCAST WITHOUT THE EXPRESSED WRITTEN CONSENT OF TMAC GOLF