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Home Daily Golf Briefs Daily Pulse for July 2, 2018

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VOLUME 8, NUMBER 129                                                       
Monday, July 2, 2018

ANY IDEA WHO SAID THIS? “Transferring from starter to closer was a huge, huge hurdle to overcome. I know that the end of the season it looked easy, but it wasn't, it was one of the hardest things I ever had to do. This was probably the hardest thing I've ever done because nothing I'm doing prepared me for this. I've learned a lot. I learned my game wasn't ready. It took too long for me to get comfortable. I felt like every time there was an opportunity to make a good shot, I would mess it up, and felt terrible. But I grinded. I don't have a routine. I got to learn a routine. I got to learn to practice. I got to learn to do some things. I plan on being back. I plan on qualifying again.”

BRAIN TEASER: Why did players wear orange ribbons at the Quicken Loans National last week?

OLD SCHOOL: Have we gotten soft? Can anyone make an argument that golf should be easy? Isn’t that its most endearing quality? While the world around has changed over the years, there are some that believe the game shouldn’t change. One player in particular, believes the USGA’s national championships are not only a throw back to a bygone era, but should never, ever deviate from it.

“USGA courses are always different than the other ones because they're always the hardest,” Rocco Mediate stated. ”They're supposed to be. What I love about U.S. Opens, it brings out your best and your worst out. And if you let it get you, it will get you. There's no question about that.

Course set up is always a major (pun intended) topic of conversation, but Mediate isn’t buying any of it. Without any prompting, he pointed to Shinnecock as well as past venues to make his point. “Truthfully, it's all been a bunch of bullshit, what I've heard, complete horse shit. I'll say it again if you want me to. Here's the deal. If you don't like how it was set up, A, hit better shots; B, don't come. Don't come. Someone will take your place. It's real, real simple. Now I’m getting mad. They're talking about, well, you just shot 10 feet right of the pin, rolled into the bunker. Hit it left of the pin, then, okay? Because everybody's got to play the golf course.

“Let me ask you this question, too. Remember the one about the golf course changed from the morning -- have you ever played one that didn't? Of course it's going to change. That's what it's supposed to do. Sometimes it can get softer in the afternoon. Sometimes it gets firmer.”

Mediate wasn’t impressed with the feedback that came from the 2018 US Open and he didn’t hold back on his thoughts. “What I heard that week made me want to throw up, basically,” he said. “Just shut up, play. Because I guarantee you that trophy, that beautiful trophy they give away, is way worth the crap you have to go through to win it. It is. I haven't done that yet, but it is.”

Some fans may have become disenchanted with the USGA’s handling of the national championship. But Mediate isn’t one of them. “First of all, it's our National Open, which is my favorite tournament. But it's the test you get. You get to test how your game really is. Week-in and week-out you do, but you don't, comparatively to this. This is, if you miss, it costs you something, most of the time. Unless you do something miraculous. Which is fun too, that's part of golf also. But I like when you, when it costs you something to miss fairways. That's gone, as you know. It's gone. And the only thing that keeps it alive is our U.S. Opens. The only thing. And it used to be something that was important. Even on the TOUR for all the years I played, you had to drive it straight because we actually had rough back then. That's gone. Most of it is gone. So the smash and the gouge and wedge thing, a lot of guys think that's how golf's supposed to be played. And it makes me sick. Fairways are cut shorter because they're easier to play out of and that's where you should be, that's where the game starts. I was taught that. If you drive it in the fairway you can play good 90 percent of the time and it's a fact. You can still screw it up, but it is way easier from the fairway than anywhere else. So I've always loved our National Open because of the test it gives you. And it tests you mentally. It's not even half of it is physical, it's mostly in your head. Because there are certain things you see out there that you don't like.” Mediate likes what he sees with the US Open even if others don’t!

WALK OR RIDE? Club Car may be about to redefine how golf is played. The brand of Ingersoll Rand is launching Tempo Walk, a new hands-free autonomous golf TEMPOWALKcaddie unit. The Tempo Walk offers state-of-the-art wireless technology including GPS yardage and hands-free remote control to maneuver easily around the course. Constructed with a durable aluminum frame, Tempo Walk contains a lithium ion battery, which holds a 36-hole charge. It moves up to 7 mph and weighs 95 pounds.

“Tempo Walk is the perfect blend of tradition and technology, bringing a new golf experience to the course; one that will excite golfers and provide a fun, healthy experience for 18 holes,” said Mark Wagner, president of Club Car. “The Tempo Walk further underscores our commitment to move the game of golf forward, particularly for the thousands of golf courses that attract a significant number of health-conscious walkers and are looking to generate a new revenue stream for their operation.”

Additional technology featured in the Tempo Walk includes a USB port and touchscreen tablet with GPS yardage. Traditional golf car offerings – a cup holder, cooler, divot repair and sand bottle, are also included. With a compact frame size, four Tempo Walk golf caddies can fit into the space of one golf car, another benefit for course operators.

“The Club Car Tempo Walk is a win-win. Golfers who enjoy walking the course get a caddie-like experience, and course operators get a fresh, functional and environmentally friendly cart option to offer customers,” said Susan Casagranda, the president of Torrey Pines Club Corp, one of the first courses to use Tempo Walk. “The Tempo Walk has resonated well with our golfers, and has given them a fun way to enjoy a round of golf.”

DOUBLE DIGIT GROWTH IS STILL POSSIBLE: Mizuno has reported strong sales figures in all categories for the full year (April 2017 to March 2018) across its EMEA golf operation, with net sales up 12% year-on-year (YOY). “2017/18 has been a benchmark year for the Mizuno brand,” said Rob Jackson, Head of Golf EMEA. “It has been a year of real momentum for us with traction out on tour that has translated into strong retail sales across all categories.” READ MORE>>>

THE GARDEN STATE: The PGA of America announced Baltusrol Golf Club will host the KPMG Women’s PGA Championship in 2023 and the PGA Championship in 2029.

AUCHTUNG: Could this be proof that golf is growing? Leonie Harm made history as she became the first German to lift the Ladies Amateur British Championship trophy. The 20-year-old from Stuttgart, who won the German International Amateur earlier this month, book a spot in the starting field of the RICOH Women’s British Open at Royal Lytham & St Annes in August by virtue of her victory.

WEB GEMS:

IMPRESSIVE PERFORMANCE: Francesco Molinari delivered a record performance to win the final edition of the Quicken Loans National. Tiger Woods closed with a 66, his lowest final round in more than five years, and he was never close. Woods tied for fourth, his best result since a runner-up finish at the Valspar Championship three months ago, though he was 10 shots behind. READ MORE>>>
 
SWEDE SUNDAY: Alex Noren birdied two of his last three holes at Le Golf National to claim his second Rolex Series title on a dramatic final afternoon at the HNA Open de France. The Swede entered round four seven shots off the lead and still did not look a likely winner when he turned in 35 as the final groups battled it out atop the leaderboard. READ MORE>>>

ANSWERS: “Transferring from starter to closer was a huge, huge hurdle to overcome. I know that the end of the season it looked easy, but it wasn't, it was one of the hardest things I ever had to do. This was probably the hardest thing I've ever done because nothing I'm doing prepared me for this. I've learned a lot. I learned my game wasn't ready. It took too long for me to get comfortable. I felt like every time there was an opportunity to make a good shot, I would mess it up, and felt terrible. But I grinded. I don't have a routine. I got to learn a routine. I got to learn to practice. I got to learn to do some things. I plan on being back. I plan on qualifying again.”--MLB Hall of Famer, John Smoltz on his performance at the US Senior Open.

Hunter Mahan withdrew from the Quicken Loans due to a family issue. His sister-in-law, Katie Enloe diagnosed with leukemia was sent home from the hospital to spend her final days with family. She is married to SMU golf coach Jason Enloe, who is also a former Web.com Tour player. In support of Enloe, PGA Tour players wore orange ribbons at TPC Potomac last week. 

THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IS BELIEVED TO BE RELIABLE, BUT IT IS NOT GUARANTEED. THE OPINION EXPRESSED IS THAT OF TERRY MCANDREW AND SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED A SOLICITATION TO BUY OR SELL SECURITIES IN ANY OF THE COMPANIES DISCUSSED WITHIN THIS NEWSLETTER. CONTENTS OF THIS NEWSLETTER MAY NOT BE REPRINTED OR REBROADCAST WITHOUT THE EXPRESSED WRITTEN CONSENT OF TMAC GOLF