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Home Daily Golf Briefs Daily Pulse for November 15, 2018

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Web Street Golf Daily Pulse
VOLUME 8, NUMBER 224                                                       
Thursday, November 15, 2018

ANY IDEA WHO SAID THIS? “I contemplated it. I was having lunch with Phil. It was at one of the FedExCup events and I said, I might watch it. He took $25 out of his pocket and said, ‘No, here's $25. I'll pay for it for you. Thank you.’’ Look, 15 years ago, it would have been great, but I think nowadays, it missed the mark a little bit.”

BRAIN TEASER: Since 2010, this player’s 67.73 stroke average is the lowest scoring average of any player at The RSM Classic (min 13 rounds). He is 47-under par on the Seaside course at Sea Island Resort. Can you name him?

KEEPING UP WITH THE JONES: Golf has been very successful in one department. There has been growing concern regarding participation rates and course closures ever since 2008, when the economy was deflated by the financial crisis. Yet despite these concerns, the professional game has managed to up the anti when it comes to available funds for its players. Case in point, the woman’s game, which often doesn’t get the respect it deserves, has found a slice of the money pie.

Beginning in 2019, the season-ending CME Group Tour Championship will have a $5 million purse – matching the richest in women’s golf – and the winner will pocket $1.5 million, the largest first prize in the women’s game. The move doubles the Tour Championship prize money from $2.5 million to $5 million, matching the U.S. Women’s Open as the richest in women’s golf.

“CME Group has made a huge impact on the LPGA Tour during our nine years together, and today’s news is an absolute game changer for the LPGA and its members,” Commissioner Mike Whan said. “With the Race to the CME Globe, we already had a grand finish to the LPGA Tour season. With these changes, it’s now bigger money, smaller field, and any player in the Tour Championship can win – game on!” 

“We will be evolving our CME Group Cares Challenge by introducing a new Score 1 for St. Jude program to support the St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital mission of finding cures and saving lives,” said CME Group Chairman and CEO Terry Duffy.

EURO TOUR CHIEF STILL BULLISH: “Our two critical KPIs [key performance indicators] are playing opportunity and prize funds,” he explains. “The 100th-ranked player in 2016 made 275,000 euros. This year, they are going to make over 400,000 euros. This year on the schedule, I think there are 4,382 playing opportunities, which is a little up from last year but it’s five or six hundred more playing opportunities than a couple of years ago. And as a members’ organization, that’s key, providing opportunities for people. We’re thrilled with the media value and we’re thrilled with what the Rolex Series has brought to the tour.” READ MORE>>>

WEB GEMS:

ITS NOT THE SAME ANYMORE: Growing up in Melbourne, I was always told that the Australian Open was golf’s ‘fifth major.’ It had such a great history, so the case was persuasive. Arnold Palmer, Jack Nicklaus and Gary Player had all regularly come down to play and all three had won the event. So I was sold. But, looking back now, that our Open was hailed as the fifth most important event in the game is hard to imagine. I speak from experience. When I won the Australian Open in 2010 I was competing around the world at the highest level. READ MORE>>>

SMALL FAVOR TURNS TO BIG ATTENTION: Cameron Champ was a freshman in high school and a graduate of The First Tee program, missing only the means to travel the country to play junior golf tournaments with hopes of getting noticed outside Northern California. One phone call made a difference as big as some of his drives. His father called John Wood, an old friend from high school in Sacramento who at the time was caddying for Hunter Mahan. “He said his son was into golf and would I come out and spend a day with him,” Wood said Wednesday morning from the Australian Open, where he now works for Matt Kuchar. “You get those calls and figure you’ll go watch a guy shoot 80. But I literally watched Cam hit three shots and thought: ‘Hang on. Something is very, very, very different here.’ You could see the physical talent, and he’s such a polite kid, the kind you’d want to help. His potential was off the charts.” READ MORE>>>

ANSWERS: “I contemplated it. I was having lunch with Phil. It was at one of the FedExCup events and I said, I might watch it. He took $25 out of his pocket and said, ‘No, here's $25. I'll pay for it for you. Thank you.’’ Look, 15 years ago, it would have been great, but I think nowadays, it missed the mark a little bit.”--Rory McIlroy.

Since 2010, Webb Simpson’s 67.73 stroke average is the lowest scoring average of any player at The RSM Classic (min 13 rounds). Simpson is 47-under par on the Seaside course at Sea Island Resort, the second-best of any player at this course (Kevin Kisner, -48).

THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IS BELIEVED TO BE RELIABLE, BUT IT IS NOT GUARANTEED. THE OPINION EXPRESSED IS THAT OF TERRY MCANDREW AND SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED A SOLICITATION TO BUY OR SELL SECURITIES IN ANY OF THE COMPANIES DISCUSSED WITHIN THIS NEWSLETTER. CONTENTS OF THIS NEWSLETTER MAY NOT BE REPRINTED OR REBROADCAST WITHOUT THE EXPRESSED WRITTEN CONSENT OF TMAC GOLF