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Home WHAT COMES NEXT?

By in large (no pun intended) driver designs up until recent years were concentrated on volume. The bigger the better was the motto until the USGA stepped in and restricted it to a limit of 460 ccs. Consumers in the beginning were somewhat resistant towards the beefed up mass that is until it became evident that it also enhanced the forgiveness properties. In turn the equivalent of visible technology was born in the eyes of club companies, retailers and consumers. Along the way with the greater bulk came an increase in the MOI properties, (resistance to twisting) which allowed for off center contact to improve performance. Even the best of the best became adapters to the engineering even though the focus, back in the day, was more towards COR which morphed into CT within the alphabet soup of club design.

In the past few years, since club
companies have reached the maximum
tolerances under the USGA regulations,
there have been some different paths
club companies have migrated to in
building more effective and efficient
products. Its worth noting that over the
past 10 to 20 years with the evolution of
drivers it has gone from being the most
difficult club to hit for many recreational
players to one of the easiest. Drivers of the future have progressed from being game improvement clubs to optimization of ball flight and spin rate through the assistance of launch monitors. Once upon
a time equipment companies created the
equivalent of a plug and play application
by introducing one model for everyone.
Player and swing types (speed) recognized
that not everyone is the same and
necessitated multiple offerings based on
different criteria. As 2009 is ushered in,
what’s next? Nike Golf has devoted plenty
of time and resources to the topic and
arrived at some interesting conclusions. To
see where the equipment company for the
world’s #1 player is taking driver design next
read the December 15th issue of Web Street Golf Report. If your not a member already sign up for a free trial (three weeks) by clicking on the subscribe button.